Program Overview

Economics describes and analyzes the organization and operation of an economic system. While much can be learned from the economic systems of other countries, most courses in this program focus on the western market economy. An understanding of economics is essential for all careers in management and to becoming a well-informed citizen and participant in society.

The economics program offers courses which serve all majors in the College of Management and those leading to the two tracks in the economics major. The business economics track prepares students for work in the quantitative areas of business: market research, business forecasting, financial analysis, economic modeling and simulation, operations, and quantitative decision making. The more traditional economics track prepares students for graduate study in economics and professional study in law, public administration, business and public policy.

Many economics courses may be used to fulfill the university's general education/liberal studies requirements.

More information about this program

Declare Your Program

To be eligible for acceptance to the Economics major, students must submit a College of Management Undergraduate Program Declaration Form when the following is completed:

  • Economics Foundation Courses with a grade of C- or better (see below)

The Economics Foundation Courses are prerequisites for many upper division College of Management courses. Completing these courses early in your program will help you succeed and have the most valuable experience in other College of Management courses.

Declare Your Program Button

Requirements

College of Management Double Major Policy

Students may combine any two majors in the College of Management as a double major as long as there are at least 24 upper division semester credits of coursework in the second major that do not overlap the first major. Both majors must be completed at the time of graduation.

General Education and Liberal Studies

Students in degree programs at Metropolitan State University must complete while at the university, or transfer to the university, a number of courses to meet General Education and Liberal Studies (GELS).

In addition, courses required for your specific program are listed in the right column on this page. They include prerequisite, foundation, core and elective courses. Contact your advisor with questions concerning your degree plan.

How Admissions Works

We are looking forward to you joining us. Take the first step by filling out this application.
Course List

Prerequisites

Requirements ( 120 total credits)

At least 40 upper division distributed in general education/liberal studies, foundation courses and study in economics or business economics.

  • MIS 100 Fundamentals of Information Technology in Organizations
    4 credits

    This course is the first information technology foundation course in the College of Management. It focuses on the technology literacy, managerial and business problem solving dimensions of computer based information systems. It provides students with an introduction to the fundamental terminology of the hardware, software and the people involved with computer based information systems. The course includes hands on computer lab time to introduce students to word processing, database, spread sheet, and Internet microcomputer applications. This course is designed specifically to prepare students for information technology competence as needed in College of Management courses.

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  • One of the following classes is required:
    • MATH 210 Calculus I
      4 credits

      Since its beginnings, calculus has demonstrated itself to be one of humankind's greatest intellectual achievements. This versatile subject has proven useful in solving problems ranging from physics and astronomy to biology and social science. Through a conceptual and theoretical framework this course covers topics in differential calculus including limits, derivatives, derivatives of transcendental functions, applications of differentiation, L'Hopital's rule, implicit differentiation, and related rates.

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    • MATH 208 Applied Calculus
      4 credits

      This course provides an overview of the differential calculus for single and multivariable functions and an introduction to the integral calculus and differential equations, with an emphasis on applications to the natural and physical sciences. Particular topics covered in the course include limits, ordinary and partial derivatives, applications of derivatives, definite integrals, fundamental theorem of calculus, applications of definite integrals, models involving differential equations, Eulers method, equilibrium solutions.

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  • STAT 201 Statistics I
    4 credits

    This course covers the basic principles and methods of statistics. It emphasizes techniques and applications in real-world problem solving and decision making. Topics include frequency distributions, measures of location and variation, probability, sampling, design of experiments, sampling distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression.

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  • ECON 201 Macroeconomics
    3 credits

    This course focuses on the economy as a whole and studies how government can affect the economy. After starting with principles of markets, the price system and supply and demand, the course covers national income accounting, business cycles, inflation, unemployment, fiscal policy, monetary policy and the Federal Reserve System, different approaches to economic growth, and the foundations of international trade.

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  • ECON 202 Microeconomics
    3 credits

    This course focuses on the interactions between the consumer and the producer. It begins with the theory of markets, supply and demand, and the price system. Then it covers demand elasticity, the costs of production including the various factor inputs, the four major market structures (pure competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly and monopoly), and ways to increase the competition in markets.

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Economics Track Required Courses (16 credits)

Note: ECON 497 is a capsone class which should be taken near the end of student's program

  • ECON 351 Intermediate Macroeconomics
    4 credits

    Topics covered in this course include: measuring economic performance; the determination of income and expenditures; the role of government in influencing general equilibrium and economic fluctuations; the development of stabilization policies; and the operations of financial markets. The analytical approaches are more advanced than those in ECON 201 Macroeconomics.

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  • ECON 352 Intermediate Microeconomics
    4 credits

    This course covers the analysis of consumption behavior and demand using the theory of utility and indifference, the theory of production and costs, and analysis of the firm and industries under the four market structures. Factor pricing and general equilibrium using comparative static analysis techniques are also covered. Selected topics include: market failure, price ceilings and floors under different market structures, subsidies, regulations, price discrimination, and consumer and producer surplus.

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  • ECON 420 Money, Banking and Financial Institutions
    4 credits

    This course is designed for business and economics students interested in acquiring a broader view of the financial system and its markets. The material is divided into three sections: historical, theoretical and institutional. The historical section covers the evolution of money, money creation, inflation, the economy, and the development of banking. The theoretical part covers methods to trace the impact of money on the economy including classical, Keynesian, monetarist and rational expectation approaches. The institutional portion deals with financial intermediaries and financial instruments.

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  • ECON 497 Economic Research and Forecasting
    4 credits

    This course prepares students for the task of analyzing primary and secondary economic data in order to assist decision makers in profit, nonprofit and public organizations. It also provides an introduction to econometrics: regression models, serial correlation, forecasting, simultaneous equation estimation, model building, time series and simulations. Students work on a major project during the course.

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Economics Track Electives (16 credits, choose four courses)

  • ECON 311 Economics of the Environment
    4 credits

    This course explores the economic aspects of environmental issues and regulations. Current incentives to degrade or preserve the environment are presented and the impact of present policies on those incentives are established. The tools of economic analysis are used to evaluate problems and suggest solutions.

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  • ECON 313 Labor Economics
    4 credits

    This course assesses the role of labor as a production factor in the economy, as well as the factors affecting the supply of, and demand for, labor. Topics include: determinants of labor supply and demand; analysis of labor markets; theories of wages and employment; income and wage inequality among occupations, industries and regions; the role of labor unions and collective bargaining as they affect supply and demand conditions; and the relationships among wages, inflation, unemployment and government policies.

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  • ECON 314 International and Comparative Economics
    4 credits

    This course analyzes selected issues and problems in international trade and also studies how various countries approach basic economic policy questions. Topics include: the theory of comparative advantage, barriers to trade such as tariffs and quotas, exchange rates, balance of payments, organizations such as the International Monetary Fund and World Trade Organization, and an analysis of current issues in American trade policy. The course concludes with an analysis of the economic policies of major trading partners: Japan, China and the European Union with some attention to other capitalist and noncapitalist economies.

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  • ECON 315 Economics of Diversity
    4 credits

    This course uses various techniques to examine issues and problems relevant to the themes of race, ethnicity, gender, preference and class. Topics include: how race, ethnicity and gender arise in economics and how they relate to the labor market; the impact of national economic policies on diverse groups; the economics of discrimination; and questions related to domestic partner issues.

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  • ECON 316 Health Economics
    4 credits

    This course applies microeconomics principles to the health care services field. The role of consumer choice and firm behavior are examined in the markets for health insurance and health care. An understanding of the role of public and private financing and delivery systems is developed. The tools and techniques of economics are employed to facilitate policy, analytic and management decisions in the health care field.

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  • ECON 496 Managerial Economics
    4 credits

    This course focuses on the application of economic analysis to enterprise decision making. The basic topics include analyses of demand, costs, capitalization and strategy. The purpose is to apply economics to achieve long-run profit maximization. Students apply principles of modern strategy to real case studies.

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Business Economics Track Required Courses (24 credits)

Note: ECON 497 is a capstone course which should be taken near the end of a student's program

  • ACCT 210 Financial Accounting
    4 credits

    This course in financial accounting acquaints students with the "language of business" and the concepts and practices of accounting in order to understand, interpret, and analyze the financial accounting reports of economic entities. Topics include: economic context of accounting; introduction to basic financial statements with emphasis on the statement of cash flows; measurement fundamentals; analysis of financial statements; cash; receivables; inventories; investments in equity and debt securities including Consolidations; long-lived assets; current and long-term liabilities; stockholders' equity; and time value of money concepts and computations for decision making: international accounting practices are incorporated into every topic. This is not a bookkeeping course.

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  • ECON 314 International and Comparative Economics
    4 credits

    This course analyzes selected issues and problems in international trade and also studies how various countries approach basic economic policy questions. Topics include: the theory of comparative advantage, barriers to trade such as tariffs and quotas, exchange rates, balance of payments, organizations such as the International Monetary Fund and World Trade Organization, and an analysis of current issues in American trade policy. The course concludes with an analysis of the economic policies of major trading partners: Japan, China and the European Union with some attention to other capitalist and noncapitalist economies.

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  • ECON 420 Money, Banking and Financial Institutions
    4 credits

    This course is designed for business and economics students interested in acquiring a broader view of the financial system and its markets. The material is divided into three sections: historical, theoretical and institutional. The historical section covers the evolution of money, money creation, inflation, the economy, and the development of banking. The theoretical part covers methods to trace the impact of money on the economy including classical, Keynesian, monetarist and rational expectation approaches. The institutional portion deals with financial intermediaries and financial instruments.

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  • ECON 496 Managerial Economics
    4 credits

    This course focuses on the application of economic analysis to enterprise decision making. The basic topics include analyses of demand, costs, capitalization and strategy. The purpose is to apply economics to achieve long-run profit maximization. Students apply principles of modern strategy to real case studies.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • ECON 497 Economic Research and Forecasting
    4 credits

    This course prepares students for the task of analyzing primary and secondary economic data in order to assist decision makers in profit, nonprofit and public organizations. It also provides an introduction to econometrics: regression models, serial correlation, forecasting, simultaneous equation estimation, model building, time series and simulations. Students work on a major project during the course.

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  • FIN 390 Principles of Finance
    4 credits

    This course introduces the application to financial decision-making of mathematics, statistics, economic theory, and accounting procedures. The two central ideas are time value of money and the relationship between expected return and risk, and how these ideas are used to value bonds, stocks, and other financial securities, and to make capital investment decisions.

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Business Economics Elective Courses (choose three courses from those listed below)

Note: Only one DSCI course may be applied toward the Business Economics track

  • ECON 311 Economics of the Environment
    4 credits

    This course explores the economic aspects of environmental issues and regulations. Current incentives to degrade or preserve the environment are presented and the impact of present policies on those incentives are established. The tools of economic analysis are used to evaluate problems and suggest solutions.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • ECON 313 Labor Economics
    4 credits

    This course assesses the role of labor as a production factor in the economy, as well as the factors affecting the supply of, and demand for, labor. Topics include: determinants of labor supply and demand; analysis of labor markets; theories of wages and employment; income and wage inequality among occupations, industries and regions; the role of labor unions and collective bargaining as they affect supply and demand conditions; and the relationships among wages, inflation, unemployment and government policies.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • ECON 315 Economics of Diversity
    4 credits

    This course uses various techniques to examine issues and problems relevant to the themes of race, ethnicity, gender, preference and class. Topics include: how race, ethnicity and gender arise in economics and how they relate to the labor market; the impact of national economic policies on diverse groups; the economics of discrimination; and questions related to domestic partner issues.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • ECON 316 Health Economics
    4 credits

    This course applies microeconomics principles to the health care services field. The role of consumer choice and firm behavior are examined in the markets for health insurance and health care. An understanding of the role of public and private financing and delivery systems is developed. The tools and techniques of economics are employed to facilitate policy, analytic and management decisions in the health care field.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • ECON 351 Intermediate Macroeconomics
    4 credits

    Topics covered in this course include: measuring economic performance; the determination of income and expenditures; the role of government in influencing general equilibrium and economic fluctuations; the development of stabilization policies; and the operations of financial markets. The analytical approaches are more advanced than those in ECON 201 Macroeconomics.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • ECON 352 Intermediate Microeconomics
    4 credits

    This course covers the analysis of consumption behavior and demand using the theory of utility and indifference, the theory of production and costs, and analysis of the firm and industries under the four market structures. Factor pricing and general equilibrium using comparative static analysis techniques are also covered. Selected topics include: market failure, price ceilings and floors under different market structures, subsidies, regulations, price discrimination, and consumer and producer surplus.

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  • DSCI 431 Managerial Problem-solving and Decision-making Methods
    4 credits

    This course introduces a variety of systematic behavioral and analytical approaches to problem formulation, problem solving, decision making and implementation issues. The primary focus is on conceptual and practical frameworks of successful managerial problem solving and decision making. Individual and team problem solving and decision making issues will also be addressed. Special emphasis will be placed on real-life applications of problem-solving and decision-making methods using appropriate software programs.

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  • DSCI 434 Introduction to Operations Management
    4 credits

    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and techniques of production and operations management for both service and manufacturing organizations. It will address the role of operations in relation to other functions and the methods to increase organizational effectiveness and efficiency. Topics covered include: product and service design, capacity planning, design of work systems, location planning and analysis, material requirements planning, supply-chain management, enterprise resource planning, inventory management, total quality management, Six Sigma, lean enterprise and kaizen approaches, aggregate planning, just-in-time systems, scheduling, and project planning. Also included are tools and processes used in operations decisions such as forecasting, breakeven analysis, and critical path method using available software.

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  • FIN 550 International Finance
    4 credits

    This course is an introduction to the international dimensions of corporate financing, investment, and risk management decisions. Topics include foreign exchange markets, international financial systems, foreign exchange rate determination, currency risk, spot and forward rates, hedging, international monetary and trade flows, multinational capital budgeting, and cost of capital in emerging economies. Overlap: IBUS 550 International Financial Management.

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  • ENTR 490 Challenges and Choices in Entrepreneurship and Innovation
    4 credits

    This course prepares students to start, manage and grow a new business venture. A business idea will be evaluated, as well as the process to transform the idea in a new business. Different aspects of managing and growing a new business will be examined, assisting students to make educated decisions to solidify the business.

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  • MKTG 420 Marketing Research
    4 credits

    This course examines the processes and techniques used in gathering, analyzing and reporting information that forms the basis for managerial and marketing decision making. The course content includes the study of both secondary research methods and primary research methods, with the emphasis on survey methods. There is a strong statistical analysis component, and students learn to use SPSS, statistical software used extensively in organizations that perform quantitative research. Students design and implement a marketing research study.

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