Metropolitan State University

PHIL 499 : Philosophy Capstone Seminar

A. Course Description
Credits: 4
Lab Hours/ Weeks: Corequisites: None
Lecture Hours/ Week :  
MnTC Goals: None
 
This capstone course for Philosophy majors is intended to support students in doing advanced work in philosophy. Students will work together as a community of inquiry to study a particular author, genre, period or problem selected by the instructor. Texts and topics will be chosen to illustrate the variety of styles and strategies employed by philosophers of varying cultural backgrounds and to include the critiques and contributions of authors from marginalized communities/communities of color. Each student will complete a course paper or project using concepts and methods derived from this and other philosophy courses to explore a philosophical topic of personal interest connected to the seminar topic. Prerequisite: Open to philosophy majors near graduation and to others with appropriate preparation (non-majors need instructor┬┐s permission to register).
B. Course Effective Dates: 05/09/2017 - Present
C. Outline of Major Content Areas:
See Course Description for major content areas.
D. Learning Outcomes (General)
  1. Demonstrate mastery of the discipline┬┐s scholarly writing conventions, including smooth integration of research material and correct use of documentation and citation procedures at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are characteristic of advanced-standing philosophy majors at a university.
  2. Develop a coherent and sustained argument with a clearly organized development, sufficient evidence, and significant conclusion at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are characteristic of advanced-standing philosophy majors at a university.
  3. Develop reading(s) of philosophical text(s) which demonstrates an understanding of argumentative structure, context and lacunae at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are characteristic of advanced-standing philosophy majors at a university.
  4. Perform research and integrate more than one source about the author, the text, and/or social/ historical context(s) at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are characteristic of advanced-standing philosophy majors at a university.
  5. Respond effectively to theoretically and culturally diverse research materials in support of an original thesis at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are characteristic of advanced-standing philosophy majors at a university.
  6. Demonstrate a sensitivity to the role of social identities and power relationships in the shaping of philosophical texts and problems at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are characteristic of advanced-standing philosophy majors at a university.
  7. Demonstrate familiarity with critiques and contributions by authors from underserved communities/communities of color at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are characteristic of advanced-standing philosophy majors at a university.
E. Learning Outcomes (MN Transfer Curriculum)
This contains no goal areas.
G. Special Information
None