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         denotes courses that are being offered during the current term
         denotes courses in our catalog that are not offered for the current term but will be offered some time in future terms


PSYC 560  Friday Forum Topics
The Friday Forum series, which the Metropolitan State University Psychology Department cosponsors with the Minnesota Psychological Association, is being offered for academic credit by Metro State. Each forum is on a topic of current professional importance in the field of psychology. Descriptions and dates of offerings are published in the Class Schedule and Catalyst. Note: At least 12 credits in psychology, human services, or social work prior to registration.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Note: At least 12 credits in psychology, human services, or social work prior to registration. Grading is Pass/No Credit only. MPA fee is $15.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 562G  Working with Diverse Communities 1
These seminars are open to current students as well as professionals who work or plan to work with diverse communities. Each seminar is focused on one specific issue in a community. The seminars provide opportunities for concentrated learning of issues and culturally specific knowledge relevant to working in diverse communities.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 580G  Community Change Practicum
Community engagement strategies are forefront in efforts to prevent problems in living and promote healthy communities. Students in this course will improve their analytical and practical capacity to promote comprehensive approaches to community wellness that bridge excluded cultural communities into civic processes, organizations and systems. Students will engage in community-based projects at various levels of development.


Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 601  Psychology in the Public and Community Interest 4
This course provides an advanced survey of theories, methods, and research relevant to community and applied social psychology. Community and applied social psychology seek to understand social-psychological processes between people and their environments in order to better understand a diversity of social phenomena; facilitate psychological competence and empowerment; design and carry-out effective interventions and prevention programs; and promote social change. Along with an historical overview, issues such as social-ecological theory, social problem definition, diversity, ethics, and empowerment will be addressed.


Other Information:  Community Engagement
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 602  Prevention Theories and Strategies 4
This course provides an advanced survey of theories and approaches to preventive psychology. Students will develop knowledge and skills that can be used in helping individuals, communities and organizations work to prevent issues such as violence, HIV/AIDS, substance abuse, child abuse, obesity, and other behaviorally based social, mental health, and health issues. Emphasis is placed on developing knowledge and skills relevant to creating and adapting prevention programs for use in culturally diverse communities. Topics may include: stress and coping theory/research; social support and mutual help interventions; prevention theory, research, and strategies; health promotion and other community/social change strategies.


Other Information:  Community Engagement
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 603  Advanced Social Psychology and Applications 4
An examination of the theoretical and empirical literature in social psychology focusing on social cognition, judgments and decision making, stereotyping and prejudice, interpersonal relationships, personality and the self, group processes, and social learning. Emphasis will be placed on how theories can be applied to issues and problems.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing and Admission to the Master of Arts in Psychology program.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 604  Attitudes and Social Influence 4
This course examines theory, research and application in attitudes and social influence. Topics covered include attitude formation, attitude measurement, persuasion and attitude change, group and normative influences, cognitive consistency influences, attitude strength and resistance to influence.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 608  Psychology and the Law 4
This course addresses some of the major issues arising from the interaction of law and the mental health system. Following a legal system overview, topics include civil commitment, legal and policy issues affecting the community mental health system, mental health considerations in the criminal justice process, and malpractice and other legal concerns affecting mental health professional practice.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 610  Applied Research Methods 4
The course will present a wide variety of research designs, analyses and conceptual approaches appropriate to improving our general understanding of behavior and social problems in communities. Methods such as experimental, quasi experimental, survey research, interview and observational may be covered along with issues of sampling, measurement, reliability and validity.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Undergraduate courses in social/behavioral science methods and statistics; and Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 611  Lifespan Developmental Psychology 4
Lifespan developmental psychology reviews a variety of advanced concepts, theories and principles of human development from conception, prenatal development, and young adulthood through late adulthood. This course will emphasize the cognitive, physical and social aspects of development from a topical approach and review important contemporary as well as classic theories addressing lifespan development. Discussions will include a variety of contemporary topics of developmental psychology (i.e., Gender differences in behaviors, ADHD; Childhood obesity, styles of play and cultural parenting practices) from a variety of scholarly journal articles. Other key topics that will be addressed include research design in developmental psychology, maturation, cross-cultural topics relative to parenting and lifespan development, human growth experiences and the various stages of physical development as key components influencing human behaviors.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 611  Advanced Lifespan Developmental Psychology 4
Lifespan developmental psychology reviews a variety of advanced concepts, theories and principles of human development from conception, prenatal development, and young adulthood through late adulthood. This course will emphasize the cognitive, physical and social aspects of development from a topical approach and review important contemporary as well as classic theories addressing lifespan development. Discussions will include a variety of contemporary topics of developmental psychology (i.e., Gender differences in behaviors, ADHD; Childhood obesity, styles of play and cultural parenting practices) from a variety of scholarly journal articles. Other key topics that will be addressed include research design in developmental psychology, maturation, cross-cultural topics relative to parenting and lifespan development, human growth experiences and the various stages of physical development as key components influencing human behaviors.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 614  Group Dynamics and Processes 4
Students learn advanced theory and practice of group membership skills, including group development, roles, norms and leadership responsibilities. Students also learn to apply social psychological strategies when working/consulting with community groups ¿ e.g. situational leadership styles and roles, interpersonal communication styles, conflict management, problem solving, feedback skills, facilitation, and group activity planning, presentation and processing.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 615  Qualitative Methods and Analysis in Community-Based Research 4
This course introduces students to classical and contemporary research within the qualitative (or interpretive) paradigm of social science. This course uses hands-on experience in the practicalities of a variety of methods for conducting qualitative and non-intrusive research.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 615  Qualitative Methods and Analysis 4
This course introduces students to classical and contemporary research within the qualitative (or interpretive) paradigm of social science. This course uses hands-on experience in the practicalities of a variety of methods for conducting qualitative and non-intrusive research.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 618  Program Evaluation 4
Learn how to utilize research skills in the applied area of program evaluation, including conceptualization, roles as evaluators, planning and implementing an evaluation, as well as analyzing and reporting results to stakeholders and participants. The strengths and weaknesses of various quantitative and qualitative methods of program evaluation are discussed, emphasizing an awareness of and sensitivity to potential cultural, class, and gender differences in the evaluation process. Students engage in a community-based program evaluation hands-on project.


Prerequisite(s): PSYC 610 Applied Research Methods  

Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 620  Grants in Community-based Practice 3
This course will provide an in-depth study and practice of effective grant writing principles. Students will gain an understanding of how to evaluate grant funding opportunities, how to partner with communities and collaborating agencies in the grant proposal process, how to assemble the grant proposal team and garner necessary resources, and how to prepare an effective proposal. This course will offer an opportunity for students to evaluate grant-funding opportunities and develop an actual grant proposal.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 634  Psychology of Peace and Conflict 4
This class will explore a historically grounded contextualized perspective on the psychological dimensions of interpersonal, intragroup, and intergroup conflict. It is intended to provide an overview of issues related to human aggression, conflict, violence and peace, based on the premise that an understanding of these issues can contribute to a greater ability to reduce conflict, we will examine a variety of psychological concepts and how they relate to both the theory and practice of conflict resolution. Topics include: human nature, personal and national defense, social activism, personal transformation, systems of punishment, justice and negotiation.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 643  Personnel and Industrial Psychology 4
This course focuses on principles and techniques of personnel and industrial psychology with an emphasis on applications of scientific psychology to business and organizational settings. Topics include: psychology as a science and professional practice issues; employee selection, psychological testing, performance appraisal, and training and development; leadership in organizations; motivation, job satisfaction and job involvement; organizational structure; work conditions, engineering psychology, employee safety and health, and work stress; and consumer psychology. This graduate course is appropriate for psychology students interested in or working in human service and other organizational settings.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 646  Health Psychology 4
This course will provide an advanced survey of the field of health psychology, which is concerned with the roles of behavioral/lifestyle, psychological, and social/cultural factors on health/wellness, illness and chronic disease. The course will address four general subject areas: 1) attitudes, behavior, and lifestyle factors affecting disease prevention and development; 2) stress and the related psychological and social processes associated with disease development and progression; 3) social and psychological factors involved in the illness experience; and 4) long-term social and psychological implications of chronic illness (e.g., heart disease, cancer).


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 650I  Psyc Internship



Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 655  Health Promotion and Health Policy in Community Psychology 3
This course will offer an overview of innovative models that promote work with community leaders and policy makers to adopt positive health practices and effective health policies. Students will gain an understanding of the relationship of social factors to health, an understanding of health disparities among marginalized communities, and an understanding of community-based programs that are effective in influencing health behavior and health policy. Models for community organizing and community building for health will be presented and analyzed.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 655  Health Promotion and Health Policy 3
This course will offer an overview of innovative models that promote work with community leaders and policy makers to adopt positive health practices and effective health policies. Students will gain an understanding of the relationship of social factors to health, an understanding of health disparities among marginalized communities, and an understanding of community-based programs that are effective in influencing health behavior and health policy. Models for community organizing and community building for health will be presented and analyzed.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 660I  Psychology Student Designed Independent Studies
Student-designed independent studies give Metropolitan State students the opportunity to plan their own study. This type of independent learning strategy can be useful because it allows students: to study a subject in more depth, at a more advanced level; to pursue a unique project that requires specialized study; to draw together several knowledge areas or interests into a specialized study; to test independent learning capabilities and skills; or to use special learning resources in the community, taking advantage of community education opportunities which, in themselves, would not yield a full college competence. Students should contact their academic advisor for more information.


Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 665I  PSYC Prior
PSYC PRIOR


Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 670  Program Design and Community Intervention 4
This course is intended to enhance both practical and theoretical skills in program design and community intervention. Participants will examine the elements of design and practice from a 'bottom-up' lens, a community intervention practitioner lens, and from a broader socio-political lens. Fieldwork is incorporated into the course to nurture all participants' capacities as reflective practitioners.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 672  Political Psychology 4
This course offers a broad overview of political psychology, a field that uses methods and theoretical ideas from psychology as tools to help understand political processes, with a focus on the individual Concepts from psychology, such as personality, cognition, the dynamics of social groups, attitudes, and the ways in which emotion affects decision making, are applied to issues within politics, including the media and political advertising, race relations, the perceived legitimacy of government institutions, conflict and conflict resolution, and the formation of opinions and ideologies. In addition, by describing political psychology experimentation in detail, the course teaches about how the scientific method can be applied to the study of politics.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)
PSYC 687  Environmental Psychology 4
This course explores psychological perspectives and methods being applied to environmental problems in the modern world. The ways humans have impacted and been impacted by natural and built environments are examined. Topics include weather and climate, disasters and toxic hazards, territoriality and crowding, urban and rural environments, planning and designing spaces for human behavior, and building sustainable environments. The application of attitudinal, humanistic, cognitive, behavioral and political approaches to environmental problems are discussed.


Other Information:  Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Course Outline  (pdf) (html)

Brooklyn Park - Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Education Center Minneapolis Campus Midway Center Saint Paul Campus Saint Paul Campus