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Spring 2016 Faculty Conference

Teaching Multilingual Students: From Awareness to Best Practices

Saturday, February 20, 7:30 a.m. – 2:15 p.m

Metropolitan State University, Saint Paul Campus

Keynote speaker:  Kao Kalia Yang (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCn84oHSl9g)   

Registration is now open at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SFC_2016reg-staff-faculty

Learners are increasingly arriving to the classroom with multiple language and cultural proficiencies. Learn about strategies and models to maximize learning. Share your ideas for inclusive teaching pedagogies to meet the needs of diverse learners.

This year’s faculty conference focuses on multi-lingual learners and includes a keynote address by Kao Kalia Yang, author of Latehomecomer, as well as small group sessions led by Metro State community and resident faculty members.

Conference Schedule:

7:30 - 8:30 a.m. Registration and Light Breakfast
8:30 – 9 a.m. Welcome from Dr. Devinder Malhotra
9 – 10 a.m. Keynote by Kao Kalia Yang
10 – 10:15 a.m. Break
10:15 – 11:30 a.m. Concurrent Sessions #1
11:30 – 11:45 a.m. Break
11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m. Concurrent Sessions #2
1 – 2:15 p.m. Lunch

 


Session #1 - 10:15 – 11:30 a.m.

Teachings from Home
Kao Kalia Yang, BA, MA
Founders Hall Auditorium

Continue the conversation with Kao Kalia Yang. Come and start the telling of your stories, the makings of your multicultural, multilingual classrooms. Hear how stories change lives!

Supporting English Language Learners in the Community and in Your Classroom!
Ruth Zietlow, Faculty Librarian and MN Literacy Council Volunteer, ruth.zietlow@metrostate.edu
Cavan Gahagan, Minnesota Literacy Council, Senior Learning Centers Manager, cgahagan@mnliteracy.org
Leah Hauge, Minnesota Literacy Council, Learning Center Coordinator for Open Door Learning Center –Rondo, lhauge@mnliteracy.org
Jennifer Walker, ESL instructor and MN Literacy Council Volunteer, missjenwa@gmail.com

Come and learn about adult learning centers that support English language learners in our community. Strategies will be shared to support these students in your classrooms.

As the Twin Cities continue to be a destination for many new immigrants to this country, a rich tapestry of community nonprofit support services has developed. Come and hear about one of these services! A panel consisting of Minnesota Literacy Council staff and volunteers will provide a brief description of the Minnesota Literacy Council and their Open Door Learning Center, a program that works to support adult English language learners in the Twin Cities region. The panelists will also describe and share teaching strategies used with their students that can be adapted for college level learners. For example, one topic we will discuss is the awareness and development of academic language. Time will be provided at the end of the session to brainstorm ideas with attending faculty; bring your challenging learning scenarios.

Moving Beyond the 3 “E’s”- Ethnocentrism, Essentialism, and Exceptionalism: A Case-based Approach
Dr. Ruth Staus, DNP, APRN, ANP-BC, College of Health, Community, and Professional Studies; School of Nursing

Globalization is changing the face of education, and this is particularly true in healthcare provider education. In addition to the growing number of students coming from low and middle income countries to study in the West, there has been a surge in the number of students from developed Western countries interested in working internationally in the emerging discipline of global health. Ethnocentrism, essential approaches to teaching students about culture, and Western exceptionalism create significant barriers to learning within academic settings, not only for students from diverse backgrounds, but also for those from the West. This presentation focuses on utilizing a case study approach as a possible strategy for addressing these difficult concepts within the classroom setting. Participants will work with several cases, based in a critical medical anthropology framework, to explore how this pedagogical method can be used to assist students in their understanding of science as a cultural and social construction and how the dominant White Western view of science can create barriers to effective health care provider education and global health care.

Tutor Perspectives: Multilingual Writers
Emily Urness, MFA, Faculty Writing Tutor, Center for Academic Excellence
Linda O'Malley, MAESL, Faculty Writing Tutor, Center for Academic Excellence
Heather Stockton, MAESL, Faculty Writing Tutor, Center for Academic Excellence
Tammy Darrah Wenberg, MFA , Faculty Writing Tutor, Center for Academic Excellence; Community Faculty, Communication, Writing & the Arts
Lisa Peters, BA, TEFL Certification, Graduate Writing Tutor, Center for Academic Excellence

This presentation aims to deepen faculty understanding of writing center practices and to share tutor perspectives on working with multilingual writers. Five tutor voices will share first hand experiences with multilingual writers in the Center for Academic Excellence. By sharing stories, observations, patterns, and struggles, tutors hope to facilitate a dynamic conversation with faculty in order to transform challenges into practical, actionable solutions for supporting multilingual writers. Themes explored will include cultural and interpersonal sensitivity and communication, multicultural student identity, feedback, motivation and improvement, grammar vs. content, and plagiarism. For each theme, tutors will share observations and insights, as well as provide suggestions and considerations for faculty. Tutors hope for a session that is interactive and solutions-focused. 

Multilingual Learners’ Perceptions of Teaching and Advising Best Practices
Sally Pinkston, Academic Advisor and Community Faculty, College of Management
Melissa Diaz, MIS
Taskin Haque, MIS graduate student
Bukari Hassan, Finance
Chang-Feng Shih (Willy), Computer Science

Can practices used by teachers/advisors influence multilingual students’ ability to acquire presented material? In this session, research on best practices used in teaching and advising multilingual students will be reviewed. A panel of multilingual students will then share whether they feel practices used by teachers and advisors contribute to (or challenge) their learning.  Differences and similarities between best practices as highlighted by research and best practices as highlighted by multilingual learners will be discussed.  The audience will be invited to share their best practices on teaching multilingual learners.

Talk Amongst Yourselves, Talk About Teaching
Victor B. Cole, Community Engagement Coordinator, Institute for Community Engagement and Scholarship (ICES); and Community Faculty, School of Urban Education & the Ethnic and Religious Studies Department
Allen S. Bellas, PhD, Professor, Economics, College of Management and President, Inter Faculty Organization (IFO)

This semi-unstructured session provides an opportunity for faculty to network, to share teaching tips, and to seek  advice from colleagues.  All faculty new to Metro State, new to teaching, new to Minnesota, new to MnSCU, new to IFO, and new to institutes of higher education are encouraged to attend.

 


Session #2 - 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Supporting English Language Learners in the Community and in Your Classroom!
Ruth Zietlow, Faculty Librarian and MN Literacy Council Volunteer, ruth.zietlow@metrostate.edu
Cavan Gahagan, Minnesota Literacy Council, Senior Learning Centers Manager, cgahagan@mnliteracy.org
Leah Hauge, Minnesota Literacy Council, Learning Center Coordinator for Open Door Learning Center –Rondo, lhauge@mnliteracy.org
Jennifer Walker, ESL instructor and MN Literacy Council Volunteer, missjenwa@gmail.com

Come and learn about adult learning centers that support English language learners in our community. Strategies will be shared to support these students in your classrooms.

As the Twin Cities continue to be a destination for many new immigrants to this country, a rich tapestry of community nonprofit support services has developed. Come and hear about one of these services! A panel consisting of Minnesota Literacy Council staff and volunteers will provide a brief description of the Minnesota Literacy Council and their Open Door Learning Center, a program that works to support adult English language learners in the Twin Cities region. The panelists will also describe and share teaching strategies used with their students that can be adapted for college level learners. For example, one topic we will discuss is the awareness and development of academic language. Time will be provided at the end of the session to brainstorm ideas with attending faculty; bring your challenging learning scenarios.

A Closer Look at Plagiarism among Multilingual Students
Ming-Ching Liang, PhD, Department of Communication, Writing and the Arts

Studies show English-as-Second-Language (ESL) students engage in writing practices that can be labeled as plagiarism. In this session, participants will be invited to take a closer look at the issue and to recognize factors that contribute to such “problematic” practice.  The purpose of this session is three-fold: (1) to promote awareness of cultural aspects of plagiarism, (2) to enhance participants’ knowledge about reasons behind multilingual students’ plagiarism practices, and (3) to collectively construct culturally relevant communication and education strategies appropriate to Metropolitan State University’s diverse student body. To accomplish the first objective, the historical and socio-cultural background, definitions, statistics, and typology of plagiarism will be introduced. The second objective will be met via discussion among participants about the possible reasons why multilingual students are more likely to engage in behaviors that can be labeled as plagiarism. The discussion will focus on the role of language skills, culture, education style, and social systems.  A brief presentation will synthesize the discussion and present existing literature about contributors to multilingual students’ problematic citing practices. Finally, current policies and practices will be reviewed. Participants will work in small groups to share strategies to incorporate cultural factors in the communication and education about plagiarism and academic integrity.

Student Voices
Moderator:  Lori Schroeder, PhD, Associate Director, Center for Faculty Development and Faculty, Communication, Writing and the Arts
Tsion Fekadu Mekonnen, Computer Science (Ethiopia)
Alexander Moore, Social Science (Liberia)
Antonio Pintozzi, Master in Liberal Studies (Guatemala)
Xa Fang, Biology (Hmong)
Naimia Yahyu, Nursing (Somalia)

Join us as students share their perspectives, challenges, and explore the academic implications of being a multi-lingual student at Metropolitan State University.  They offer recommendations for teaching and learning success.  Students also share their insights and lived experiences and discuss what it is like coming to the US, the challenges in coming here, academic challenges to being a multi-lingual student, and opportunities that being a multi-lingual student presents.  Students describe effective teaching strategies that help support their success. Attendees will gain insight into what it is like being a student from another country.  They will increase their understanding of the academic implications of being a multi-lingual student.

Universal Design for Learning and Diversity: A Supportive Model for Student Success
Yvonne RB-Banks, EdD, School of Urban Education

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) model will be used as the foundation to engage participants in the concepts that promote learning through asking, showing and using hands-on best practices.  UDL is a successful model which allows for accessibility to learning and growth.  Participants will interact with each other about how learning occurs and what has worked best in their learning experiences.  The session will focus on multiple ways learning can be expressed and assessed from diverse perspectives, including those of multilingual learners.  UDL will be used to highlight learning styles of all students.  Strategies and techniques will be discussed in how best to engage UDL options and see new teaching possibilities. The session is designed to be interactive and will allow each participant to share about successful learning experiences.    Critical Pedagogy handouts will be provided.

Where do I begin? An Interactive Question-and-Answer Session about Responding to Multilingual Students’ Writing
Jules Thompson, PhD, Director, Center for Academic Excellence and Writing Center
Suzanne Nielsen, EdD, Tutor Coordinator & Trainer, Center for Academic Excellence and Writing Center

This session, led by the Center for Academic Excellence (CAE) Writing Center’s Jules Thompson and Suzanne Nielsen, provides participants with an opportunity to ask common questions about responding to multilingual students’ writing.  Instructors are often overwhelmed by the task of commenting on student writing; Jules and Suzanne will be on hand to ease instructor anxiety and to share the knowledge gleaned from their own experiences working one-on-one with students in classroom and Writing Center contexts.

The session will begin with introductions; the session facilitators will also share relevant demographic data from the CAE about Metro State’s multilingual students. The session will then turn to an interactive question-and-answer session, wherein attendees can ask specific questions about responding to multilingual student writing.  Attendees will depart with these takeaways:

  • Increased confidence in responding to student writing
  • Increased ability to identify patterns in student writing
  • Increased ability to prioritize and limit responses
  • Increased ability to view instructor feedback as an invitation to dialogue with students about writing in the disciplines
  • Increased awareness of how instructors might use Writing Center pedagogies to foster student success in writing

Awareness of Complex Noun Phrases: One Way to Support Multilingual Readers in Making Meaning from Academic Texts
Linda O’Malley, MA, Faculty Writing Tutor, Center for Academic Excellence

Multilingual learners come to college with a long litany of linguistic skills, yet many struggle with reading their textbooks. But what makes academic texts so hard for these learners? One grammatical reason comes from the high density of complex noun phrases present in course material. In these works, complex noun phrases—a head noun with all of the modifying words found before and after—carry the primary information load. If students are not able to decipher complex noun phrases, meaning making may elude them, and textbooks remain unread. Using Michael Halliday’s functional grammar lens, this session will look at the prevalence of complex noun phrases in academic texts and their importance in meaning making. Participants will analyze short excerpts from textbooks used at Metropolitan State by parsing and explicating noun phrases. Discussion will follow about how instructors may use this grammatical awareness as one tool to assist students with maximum reading comprehension.

Registration
Online Registration is easy!  Go to https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SFC_2016reg-staff-faculty

Payment
This workshop is free to all Metro State resident and community faculty and staff.  As a token of appreciation, community faculty who participate in a minimum of nine hours of qualifying professional development activities in academic year 2015-2016 will be paid $200 (0.15 credits of summer workload).  Unlike previous years, this payment will be made in the summer, allowing the payment to count toward the maximum summer load, a limit that is less restrictive than the 10-credit limit during the academic year.  A brief written reflection must also be submitted in May.   

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