Besides the regular coursework offered in the traditional and online formats, the Information and Computer Sciences department provides the following approaches to help students gain knowledge in the field:

Priors

Policy on Gaining Credit for Prior Learning in Computer Science, Computer Information Technology, Computer Forensics or Computer Application Development Majors

Students pursuing degrees in Computer Science, Computer Information Technology, Computer Forensics or Computer Application Development may fulfill major requirements and prerequisites by taking courses at Metropolitan State University, transferring equivalent courses, requesting evaluation of prior learning or taking departmental waiver exams. Prior experience in computer literacy, word processing, spreadsheets and applications packages will not be evaluated for college credit. Students should consult their assigned advisors to discuss these options.

Upon admission to the university, those students who have expressed interest in the Computer Science, Computer Information Technology, Computer Forensics or Computer Application Development major will receive a written evaluation of their transfer credits as they apply to the major. If such an evaluation has not been provided, any student can obtain one by asking his or her advisor to request one from the Information and Computer Sciences Department. Because the advisor must provide pertinent information, all such requests should be made via an advisor.

Students who have achieved college-level learning in computing prior to entering the university can request an evaluation of prior learning. To be eligible for college credit, learning must include both theoretical and applied knowledge. Students should begin the process of prior evaluation by attending an alternative learning strategies workshop or course, discussing their ideas with their advisors and filling out a prior evaluation proposal form. At this point, the advisor can guide the student to an appropriate evaluator. All evaluators for prior learning must have collegiate experience in teaching the subject being evaluated and must be approved by the Information and Computer Sciences Department. An evaluator may require any form of documentation of prior learning including, but not limited to: tests, design documentation, program code or certificates. An oral interview is required.

In many cases, lower division requirements can be waived with the presentation of suitable documentation of prior learning or via departmental waiver exams. This is particularly true of lower division programming courses. Waivers do not lead to college credit. Options should be discussed with the student's assigned advisor.

Student Designed Independent Study (SDIS)

Since Computer Science is a fast-changing field, students might want to gain knowledge on an emerging topic or learn some specific topic more deeply. For this, the Student Designed Independent Study (SDIS) is an appropriate learning strategy. Please visit the SDIS web page for more information and the registration form.

Faculty Designed Independent Study (FDIS)

The department faculty routinely offers courses using this format where a faculty member designs a syllabus for independent study by students. ICS 381 and ICS 390 are usually offered in this format.

Internships

May I do an internship as part of my major requirements?
How can I find out about available internships?
What steps should I take when I have found an internship that interests me?

May I do an internship as part of my major requirements?

Yes. An internship is a useful way to gain work experience, which will help when applying for a job as students near graduation. It will be a significant addition to a resume. Most internships in computing are paid positions.

For the Computer Science and Computer Information Technology majors, an internship is an upper division elective, and will count toward the major, the upper division 40 credit requirement and the 120 credit graduation requirement.

Computer Application Development majors are required to complete a two credit work skills course and a six credit "residency experience." This multi-semester residency takes place over two to three semesters during junior and senior years and is usually performed at one organization. A Computer Application Development major must do a residency as a degree requirement and may not additionally do an internship as an elective.

How can I find out about available internships?

Computer Science and Computer Information Technology majors can find an internship in a variety of ways: 

  • The Internship Resources web page features internships and has a link to Handshake, which is the database that lists all job openings and internships known to the Metropolitan State Career Center.
  • Check your Metropolitan State email for notifications about internships that are sent regularly from the Information and Computer Sciences Department to all Computer Science, Computer Information Technology and Computer Application Development majors.
  • Ask your advisor for the name and contact information of the Information and Computer Sciences Department’s internship coordinator. That person often has information on available internships.
  • Computer Science and Computer Information Technology students may do a multi-semester residency for four credits and have it counted as an internship.  Students interested in this option should see the next paragraph for details.

Computer Application Development majors should check with the FUSION Director, Amy Lane, first. Lane works with a group of potential residency employers called “FUSION”.  This group of employers is looking specifically for multi-semester carefully constructed residencies. You are encouraged to start your search early since it takes time to apply, interview and get hired for a residency or internship experience. Should you not be able to find a suitable residency through the FUSION program, you can work with the department internship coordinator as described above.

Computer Science and Computer Information Technology majors can also participate in the FUSION program. Contact Amy Lane, FUSION Director.

What steps should I take when I have found an internship that interests me?

  • Once you have a lead on an internship, check with the Information and Computer Sciences Department’s internship coordinator to make sure it is suitable for internship credits in our department. The internship experience should result in both new knowledge and a new skill you are not obtaining from some course in your major. 
  • Then set up an interview with the prospective employer.
  • When you have finished interviewing with the prospective employer and the employer has expressed interest in hiring you, work with the department's internship coordinator to fill out the Academic Internship Agreement Form
  • After filling out the form, send it electronically to the person designated on the form as the internship evaluator. That person must forward it to the Information and Computer Sciences Department’s internship coordinator who will check it and then forward it to the University's Academic Internships Coordinator (Victor Cole) who will approve it. 
  • You will receive an email approving the internship. Use that email when you register and pay your tuition. Internships should start and end on semester boundaries. However, if you need an exception, discuss your situation with the department's internship coordinator.
Policy on Gaining Credit for Prior Learning in Information and Computer Sciences

Students pursuing degrees in Computer Science or Computer Information Systems may fulfill major requirements and prerequisites by taking courses at Metropolitan State, transferring equivalent courses, evaluation of prior learning or waiver. Prior experience in computer literacy, word processing, spreadsheets, and most applications packages will not be evaluated for college credit. A theory seminar version of ICS 125 Understanding and Using the Internet provides a non-classroom option for earning credit for Internet-related learning. Major requirements for computer literacy and proficiency in using applications software can often be waived. Students should consult their assigned advisors to discuss waivers.

Upon admission to the university, those students who have expressed interests in either a Computer Science or a Computer Information Systems major will receive a written evaluation of their transfer credits as they apply to the major. If such an evaluation has not been provided, any student can obtain one by asking his or her advisor to request one from the Information and Computer Sciences Department. Because the advisor must provide pertinent information, all such requests should be made via an advisor.

Students who have achieved college-level learning in computing prior to entering the university can request an evaluation of prior learning. To be eligible for college credit, learning must include both theoretical and applied knowledge. Students should begin the process of prior evaluation by attending an alternative learning strategies workshop or course, discussing their ideas with their advisors, and filling out a prior evaluation proposal form. At this point, the advisor can guide the student to an appropriate evaluator. All evaluators for prior learning must have collegiate experience in teaching the subject being evaluated and must be approved by the Information and Computer Sciences Department. An evaluator may require any form of documentation of prior learning including, but not limited to: tests, design documentation, program code or certificates. An oral interview is required.

In many cases, lower division requirements can be waived with the presentation of suitable documentation of prior learning. This is particularly true of lower division programming courses. Waivers do not lead to college credit. Options should be discussed with the student's assigned advisor.