LIT 502

Literary Criticism: 1950-Present

4 Undergraduate credits
Effective August 1, 1998 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

This course introduces influential literary theories developed between 1950 and the present. Students become familiar with the main concepts of each theory and with how these theories can be applied to particular texts, past and present. Discussions focus on how contemporary theory challenges older ideas about literature, what distinguishes literature from other uses of language, how literature should be read, what roles literature plays in social, political, and personal life, and what makes a work of literature effective.

Prerequisites

Learning outcomes

General

  • Articulate substantial and clearly presented responses to literary criticism, from 1950 to the present at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of advanced-standing English majors at a comprehensive university.
  • Conduct critical analysis that is responsive to details and to complexities of text and theme in literary criticism, from 1950 to the present at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of advanced-standing English majors at a comprehensive university.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with schools of thought and patterns of influence in literary criticism, from 1950 to the present at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of advanced-standing English majors at a comprehensive university.
  • Interpret literary criticism, from 1950 to the present, applying biographical and/or cultural evidence as relevant at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of advanced-standing English majors at a comprehensive university.
  • Know the historical and aesthetic development of literary criticism, from 1950 to the present at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of advanced-standing English majors at a comprehensive university.
  • Master the integration of critical theory into the student's own writing, including standard formatting and citation practices at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of advanced-standing English majors at a comprehensive university.
  • Read and respond to literary criticism, from 1950 to the present, with intelligence and sensitivity at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of advanced-standing English majors at a comprehensive university.
  • Understand and apply literary terms, theoretical concepts, reading strategies, and analytical methods to the study of literary criticism, from 1950 to the present at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of advanced-standing English majors at a comprehensive university.