Transportation Management Concentration (Indiv BA)

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Program eligibility requirements

Students must have equivalent of a two-year A.A.S degree or diploma to be admitted.

Program requirements

To complete this degree, students take a series of Transportation Management courses at Dakota County Technical College (DCTC), specific and elective upper division courses from Metropolitan State's College of Management. PRSP 301 and PRSP 499 in the College of Individualized Studies and fulfill all MnTC (Minnesota Transfer Curriculum)/GELS (General Education Liberal Studies) requirements. They must have at least 120 total credits, including 40 upper division credits. 

Course requirements

Requirements (120 credits, including 40 upper division credits)

Admission requirements: Students must have the equivalent of a two-year A.A.S. degree or diploma to be admitted.

To complete this degree, students take a series of Transportation Management courses at Dakota County Technical College (DCTC), required and elective upper division courses from Metropolitan State's College of Management and College of Individualized Studies and fulfill all MnTC (Minnesota Transfer Curriculum)/GELS (General Education Liberal Studies) requirements.

PRSP 301 Perspectives: Educational Philosophy and Planning

4 credits

This course considers, from a multidisciplinary perspective, the questions "What is an educated person? What character traits mark an educated person? And how does becoming educated impact one's personal, family and social life?" While it is a required course for all students who plan to complete an Individualized B.A., it is also a helpful course for students in any of the other colleges who are not sure about their major focus. The course helps students develop their own individualized degree plans or program outlines by providing time to reflect on what they want to learn and the best way to learn it. Students assess their own academic strengths and weaknesses and meet resource people from around the university who challenge them to think about education in a broad and liberating manner. While most students often focus first on their vocational goals in higher education, this course challenges students to think also about their community involvement and lifelong learning needs.

Full course description for Perspectives: Educational Philosophy and Planning

PRSP 499 Capstone

4 credits

This course is the culminating experience in a student's College of Individualized Studies program and is required of graduating seniors. Students demonstrate the relationship between what they have learned and the university's philosophical tenets and academic outcomes related to communication skills, critical thinking, multicultural understanding, global perspectives and citizenship. Students also consider their lifelong learning plans, possible career changes and future liberal learning opportunities. Students should register for this course in one of their final university semesters.

Full course description for Capstone

MKTG 300 Marketing Principles

4 credits

This course surveys factors that marketing managers take into account when creating a marketing plan, including consumer behavior principles, market segmentation, product life cycle, packaging, branding, pricing, advertising, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, product distribution methods and key laws affecting marketing practices. The course takes a practical approach to explaining how to identify marketing objectives and determine strategies for reaching them. It is useful to general business students, students who plan marketing management or marketing communications careers and those who wish to be better informed consumers. This course is also offered online. Prerequisite: Goal 1 writing requirement plus 30 credits must be satisfied.

Full course description for Marketing Principles

MGMT 360 Managing a Diverse Workforce

4 credits

This course focuses on policies and practices for effectively managing a diverse workforce in private, public and nonprofit organizations. The current context, legal environment and historical development of equal employment opportunity, affirmative action, and diversity are addressed. Students gain theoretical and practical knowledge to understand beliefs, attitudes, biases, and prejudices to more effectively manage differences in order to enhance organization productivity. A significant amount of time will be focused on racism, origin of racism, and individual responsibility of racism.

Full course description for Managing a Diverse Workforce

PHIL 320 Business Ethics

4 credits

Do business firms have obligations besides making as much money as possible for their stockholders? What are their responsibilities, if any, to their employees, their customers, and the wider community? Is it enough to obey the law, or does the law sometimes allow people to do things that are wrong? Do employees have any right to privacy on the job? To 'living wages'? To 'decent' working conditions? Does a seller have any obligation to look out for the interests of the buyer? Isn't it necessary to put the best possible 'spin' on your product and let the buyer look out for him or herself? This course will examine questions like these in light of various theories of ethics and current theories of justice. In addition to considering how we might ideally like people to act, it will also consider the challenges to personal integrity and 'doing the right thing' posed by the real world of business and by the kind of large bureaucratic organizations that dominate it.

Full course description for Business Ethics

BLAW 310 Business Law: UCC and Contracts

4 credits

This course reviews the purposes, philosophies and organization of the U.S. legal system. It provides an intensive study of the law which governs contracts for services, real estate, employment, insurance, trademark, patents and copyrights. Topics covered include legally binding contract requirements (offer and acceptance, legality of subject matter, capacity of parties and contractual consideration); circumstances which require a contract to be in writing; defenses for avoiding contractual liability; and legal remedies for breach of contract. It also focuses on the articles of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), which govern the rights and obligations of parties to transactions involving the sale of goods (Article II), commercial paper such as checks, notes and drafts (Article II), and financing arrangements in which one party gives another a security interest in property (Article IX) and the effects of federal bankruptcy laws on these transactions.

Full course description for Business Law: UCC and Contracts