Program Overview

The gerontology minor has four required core courses and one course elective. Students without experience in this area are strongly urged to do an internship for their elective. Students may use alternative learning strategies to satisfy up to eight required credits. Four credits in general education/liberal studies may be used to meet minor requirements. This minor fits well with other majors including social work and psychology.

More information about this program

Declare Your Program

After you are admitted to the university as an undergraduate student, you also need to be accepted to a specific major/program.

Declare Your Program Button

Requirements

Courses required for your specific program are listed in the right column on this page. They include prerequisite, foundation, core and elective courses. Contact your advisor with questions concerning your degree plan.

How Admissions Works

We are looking forward to you joining us. Take the first step by filling out this application.
Course List

Prerequisites

Requirements ( 20 total credits)

Gerontology Required Courses (16 credits)

  • HSG 374 Aging in America: A Personal Challenge
    4 credits

    This course, designed for students in human services fields who work with the aged, and students considering gerontology as a vocation, is an overview of the field. Topics include understanding the physiological, psychological and sociological aspects of aging, as well as myths about aging, health and social needs of the aging, and community resources and programs.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSG 376 Mental Health and Aging
    4 credits

    This course examines issues related to the cognitive and affective development of individuals in their later years. It maps the developmental phases that typically result in impairments that are not physical, and outlines a set of strategies to facilitate coping with those impairments. The course is recommended for those involved in direct services-nurses, activities staff members, social workers and others involved in rehabilitation.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSG 377 Physical Health and Aging
    4 credits

    This course is designed for professionals in the field of aging, and covers the normal physical processes of aging. Topics include health concerns, health promotion issues, and the biology and physiology of aging, as well as resources and services concerned with the physical needs of the elderly.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSG 380 Aging: Planning and Policy Making
    4 credits

    This course covers various aspects of public policy development and planning for the aged by federal, state and local agencies. Topics include how policies are planned and implemented, the effects of policies on program services, the roles and functions of community organizations and how they relate to governmental factions in developing, maintaining and upgrading services and programs for the aged.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8

Gerontology Elective Courses (4 credits from the following)

  • HSA 362 Human Services Administration
    4 credits

    This course, designed for those planning careers in human services administration, provides insight into some of the common problems and concerns of management in a human services agency. Students use actual case studies to focus on examples of organizational planning, community relations, the decision-making process and personnel management. Overlap: HSA 360 Health Care Management and Supervision I and HSA 362T Human Service Administration Theory Seminar.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSA 369 Program Evaluation
    4 credits

    This course focuses on the knowledge and skills needed to appropriately identify, collect, analyze and report evaluative information to be used in making decisions about, and changes in, programs. Topics include approaches to program evaluation, the process of planning and conducting an evaluation, basic principles and practices of designing evaluation instruments, and methods for interpreting and presenting data with an emphasis on providing relevant information to decision makers. This course is appropriate for anyone in business, public, nonprofit or human services administration who is responsible for making decisions about service programs or for conducting evaluations.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSDS 308 Aging and Disabilities
    4 credits

    The aging of persons with disabilities is a new phenomenon due to improved health and advances that have increased their life-span. In addition, the aging of the baby-boomers is increasing the population of persons acquiring disabilities as they age. Is our society prepared to meet the needs of both groups? How can we prepare to assist all older persons in maintaining quality of life as they age? The need for collaboration across disability and aging networks to analyze these questions is a focus of this course.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSER 352 Family Counseling
    4 credits

    This course explores the dynamics and processes of family interactions and counseling from the viewpoint of a family counselor. Some of the major theories of family counseling are discussed, with particular emphasis on the theories of Virginia Satir. Evaluation is based in part on a final conference with the instructor. This course is designed for students seeking self-understanding, as well as for students pursuing careers in the human services.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSER 354 Ethical Issues in Human Services
    4 credits

    Students confront complex ethical and moral issues in their professional and personal lives. In this course, students study and apply the cultural, social, legal, economic, theological and philosophical bases for making such decisions. Each student learns to articulate coherent arguments involving at least two divergent views of many current ethical issues confronted in human services today. Students select, research and present an individual project on a major ethical issue relevant to their professional interests in human services.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSFS 399 Selected Topics in Family Assistance
    2 credits

    The topics covered in the different sections of this course vary from semester to semester. The focus of each section is on the concerns as well as the supports needed by selected types of family arrangements. The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with the specific, respective issues of different family configurations as well as to allow students to critique appropriate strategies for helping and empowering them. Possible topics include: working with foster families, working with GLBT families, working with grand-parent-headed families, working with teen families, working with homeless families, working with families of offenders working with bi-racial families and so on. Students should consult the Class Schedule for family types featured each semester. Note: This course may be taken four times for credit as long as the topic is different.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSG 378 Thanatology: The Study of Death and Dying
    4 credits

    This course helps students become aware of their own attitudes and values about dying and death, and how these affect others. It investigates myths concerning dying and death, the effect of personal and cultural attitudes on a person's ability to communicate with the dying and their families, death industries, historical perspectives, and euthanasia. The course includes field trips.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSG 383 Selected Topics in Gerontology
    4 credits

    This independent study is for students who intend to work as professionals in the gerontology field and wish to study a specific topic in-depth. Assignments and prerequisites depend on the selected topic.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSG 384 Civic Engagement in Later Life
    4 credits

    Older persons are increasingly defying stereotypes through their dedication to civic, social, and creative causes. In this course, students will examine how activism can be part of successful aging, as well as how older persons contribute to society through a variety of civic engagement activities, ranging from community involvement and volunteerism to participation in the political process.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSTD 393 Training Design and Instruction
    4 credits

    This course is for students who want to learn how to design training and teach adults in an organizational setting. Students develop an understanding of the role and impact of training in helping organizations reach objectives. Topics include adult learning theory, needs assessment, instructional design, media selection and how to present training content to different audiences.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8