Program Overview

A minor in family studies can serve as a support area for students majoring in one of the social or behavioral sciences such as psychology or sociology. In addition, a minor can serve as an ideal complement for students in a professional field, such as social work, nursing, education or law enforcement.

The family studies minor has three required core courses and two elective courses. There are three designated options within the family studies minor. Contact an academic advisor or the advising office for information on these options.

More information about this program

Declare Your Program

After you are admitted to the university as an undergraduate student, you also need to be accepted to a specific major/program.

Declare Your Program Button

Requirements

Courses required for your specific program are listed in the right column on this page. They include prerequisite, foundation, core and elective courses. Contact your advisor with questions concerning your degree plan.

How Admissions Works

We are looking forward to you joining us. Take the first step by filling out this application.
Course List

Prerequisites

Requirements ( 20 total credits)

Family Studies Minor Required Courses (12 credits)

Students must take HSFS 143 at the start of their matriculation into the program.

  • HSFS 143 The Family: A Social/Psychological Exploration
    4 credits

    This course introduces students to the major social and psychological theories employed in studying family processes and in studying how families function in society today. In addition, the course engages students in an examination of their own families. Key features of this course are that students do a modified social history and case study of their own families. Students demonstrate competence by applying the content of the course in their analysis of their own family's social/psychological analysis.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSFS 338 Family: Racial, Gender and Class Dimensions
    4 credits

    This course familiarizes students with the diversity that exists in families. It is intended for students who want to gain a better understanding of the family, and for students specializing in psychology or human services related fields. Structural inequalities in society based on wealth, race/ethnicity and gender are presented as key determinants in the diversity of family forms and in differing experiences within families.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSFS 339 Issues and Actions in Family Policy
    4 credits

    This course considers the impact of public choices on life within families. It is generally offered during the state legislative session in order to give students opportunity to participate in the legislative process. The policy issues covered vary from year to year. Topics may cover competing rights of children and parents, culturally-specific/friendly family policy, international family policy comparisons, and other family policy issues.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8

Family Studies Minor Electives (8 credits)

  • HSCD 301 Substance Use and the Family
    4 credits

    This course is designed to teach students to understand the family dynamics of the person who is chemically dependent and to learn skills which will help them to work with these families at a beginning level. Course topics include family relationships and chemical dependency, and treatment theories and counseling techniques for individuals and their family members.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSER 352 Family Counseling
    4 credits

    This course explores the dynamics and processes of family interactions and counseling from the viewpoint of a family counselor. Some of the major theories of family counseling are discussed, with particular emphasis on the theories of Virginia Satir. Evaluation is based in part on a final conference with the instructor. This course is designed for students seeking self-understanding, as well as for students pursuing careers in the human services.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSER 415 Spirituality and Helping
    4 credits

    For the past 30 years helping professionals have deliberated about the role and integration of spirituality or religion in their practice. It is accepted that as clients race, ethnicity, and culture affect their thoughts, feelings, and behavior, so similarly do clients spiritual or religious orientations affect how they function in world and thus perceive and deal with their problems. This course is designed to introduce students to the issues related to spirituality and helping as well as to provide a framework for developing an ethical spiritually-sensitive practice that is cognizant of the significance of these orientations. Students will explore relevant knowledge, skill, and value competencies for success in this frontier of the helping field.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSFS 341 Work and Family
    4 credits

    Until recently, the worlds of family and work were seen as separate spheres. Today, people are aware of the many possible relationships between work and family in society. This course examines the challenges, issues and problems associated with a variety of contemporary work-family patterns including single-provider, dual-provider and single-parent families, and families who own their own businesses.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSFS 342 Children in U.S. Society
    4 credits

    This interdisciplinary course explores historical and contemporary aspects of children's status and roles in family and society, adults' relationships and functions in relation to children, and public policy affecting children in twentieth-century United States. Community and experience-based learning, including a student-designed project, augment class lectures and discussion.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSFS 399 Selected Topics in Family Assistance
    2 credits

    The topics covered in the different sections of this course vary from semester to semester. The focus of each section is on the concerns as well as the supports needed by selected types of family arrangements. The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with the specific, respective issues of different family configurations as well as to allow students to critique appropriate strategies for helping and empowering them. Possible topics include: working with foster families, working with GLBT families, working with grand-parent-headed families, working with teen families, working with homeless families, working with families of offenders working with bi-racial families and so on. Students should consult the Class Schedule for family types featured each semester. Note: This course may be taken four times for credit as long as the topic is different.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSG 378 Thanatology: The Study of Death and Dying
    4 credits

    This course helps students become aware of their own attitudes and values about dying and death, and how these affect others. It investigates myths concerning dying and death, the effect of personal and cultural attitudes on a person's ability to communicate with the dying and their families, death industries, historical perspectives, and euthanasia. The course includes field trips.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8
  • HSVP 308 Family Violence Across the Lifespan
    4 credits

    This course is designed as an introduction to the study of family violence across the lifespan. It will introduce students to history, current theories, research, and policies in the three areas of family violence: child maltreatment, elder abuse, domestic violence. You will examine the cultural, social and political roots of family violence, as well as the dynamics of abuse in the family and in intimate relationships. You will explore the effects of abuse at the individual, family, and community levels, and be able to identify abusive and controlling behaviors. The content of the course focuses on current theories, research and policies on domestic violence (battering, sexual assault, stalking), child maltreatment (physical and sexual abuse, emotional abuse, neglect) and abuse of vulnerable adults (elderly, non-elderly vulnerable populations). This course is an introduction to the topic. It will give students a basic overview of the issues across types of family violence intervention and prevention and how societies have responded through direct services, community sanctions, the criminal justice system, and public policy. The course will also integrate issues of gender, race, culture, age, physical ability, and sexual orientation throughout our examination of these topics.

    Course Outline Class Schedule <<<<<<< HEAD ======= >>>>>>> 35179410ff55d83bece68cc1d84aadaa0fa744b8