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BIOL 106 Biology of Women

This course is an introduction to the health and biology of women, focusing on the major health and disease concerns for women (heart disease, stroke, cancer, osteoporosis, menstruation, pregnancy, infertility) and the biological systems involved (cardiovascular, neurological, skeletal, endocrine, and reproductive etc.). No dissection is required. Lab included. Intended for general education students and students needing a one-semester introduction to human biology or the biology of women.

Prerequisites

Special information

First day attendance is mandatory.
4 Undergraduate credits

Effective September 29, 2003 to present

Meets graduation requirements for

Learning outcomes

General

  • Demonstrate understanding of scientific facts and theories in biology.
  • Formulate and test hypotheses by performing laboratory experiments in biology, including the collection of data, statistical and graphical analysis of results, and an interpretation of its sources of error and uncertainty.
  • Communicate their experimental findings, analyses, and interpretations both orally and in writing.
  • Explain and apply knowledge of health and disease concerns for women (heart disease, stroke, cancer, osteoporosis, menstruation, pregnancy, infertility) and the biological systems involved cardiovascular, neurological, skeletal, endocrine, and reproductive etc.
  • Understand and apply knowledge of measurement and use of lab equipment and use that knowledge in the proper conduct and interpretation of laboratory investigations.
  • Demonstrate quantitative reasoning skills and competency with arithmetic and statistics at a level appropriate for graduates of bachelors degree programs.
  • Demonstrate mastery of the biology concepts and vocabulary necessary for success in a general biology course for biology majors, in programs that require a one-semester introduction to human biology or the biology of women, and for informed citizenship.

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Goal 3: Natural Sciences

  • Demonstrate understanding of scientific theories.
  • Formulate and test hypotheses by performing laboratory, simulation, or field experiments in at least two of the natural science disciplines. One of these experimental components should develop, in greater depth, students' laboratory experience in the collection of data, its statistical and graphical analysis, and an appreciation of its sources of error and uncertainty.
  • Communicate their experimental findings, analyses, and interpretations both orally and in writing.
  • Evaluate societal issues from a natural science perspective, ask questions about the evidence presented, and make informed judgments about science-related topics and policies.

Spring 2021

Section Title Instructor
50 Biology of Women Self, Kendra Leigh Smith Books Course details
51 Biology of Women Mills, Melissa Ann Books Course details

Summer 2021

Section Title Instructor
50 Biology of Women Self, Kendra Leigh Smith Books Course details