HIST 353A

Topics in European History

4 Undergraduate credits
Effective December 11, 2009 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

Course topics offered under this title present a variety of approaches to European history. Possible topics include: focused study of one country or region; comparative research in family history (conditions in the European country of origin versus those encountered upon arrival in the United States); women and work; cultural and intellectual history; and focused study of a relatively short time span, socialism and communism. Students should check the Class Schedule for specific course content.

Prerequisites

Learning outcomes

General

  • Understands and is able to explain the historical significance of both primary and secondary sources, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university
  • Can practice critical and analytical skills on historical theories, controversies, and debates as well as on primary sources, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.
  • Acquires and improves writing and communication skills by submitting essays that require the organization, analysis, synthesis, and explanation of historical facts and original argumentation, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Goal 5: History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.
  • Examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures.
  • Use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories.
  • Develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues.