HIST 372

History of Japanese Popular Culture

4 Undergraduate credits
Effective May 9, 2005 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

In this course, we will examine various aspects of Japanese popular culture from the Tokugawa period, through the imperial era (1868-1945), to the postwar/contemporary time (1945-present), though more emphasis is put on postwar Japan. Critical analysis of different forms of cultural production, from the theoretical and thematic perspectives of class, gender, globalization, modernity, national/racial/ethnic identity, sexuality, invented traditions, and war memory, will provide insight into Japanese history, culture, and society.

Prerequisites

Learning outcomes

General

  • Can analyze factors affecting the transnational nature of popular culture, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.
  • Can evaluate discrepancies between official ideologies and ideas represented by popular culture, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.
  • Knows the political, economic, and cultural elements which have influenced Japanese popular cultural historically, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.
  • Understands the role of a world citizen who consumes popular cultural products and assigns meanings to them, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Goal 5: History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.
  • Examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures.
  • Use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories.
  • Develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues.

Goal 8: Global Perspective

  • Describe and analyze political, economic, and cultural elements which influence relations of states and societies in their historical and contemporary dimensions.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of cultural, social, religious and linguistic differences.
  • Analyze specific international problems, illustrating the cultural, economic, and political differences that affect their solution.
  • Understand the role of a world citizen and the responsibility world citizens share for their common global future.