HIST 531G

Religion and Politics in America

4 Graduate credits
Effective January 24, 2000 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

Religion has always been deeply enmeshed in American political life, despite the American tradition of separation of church and state. Today, some fear an erosion of that separation, while others complain that we live in a "culture of disbelief" where religion is not respected. This course examines controversies surrounding religious belief, religious practice and religious diversity in industrial America, giving students the opportunity to decide for themselves what the place of religion in modern America is and ought to be. Students of diverse religious backgrounds are most welcome, but a respect for the beliefs of others is a condition of participation. (Also listed as Hist 331, RelS 355 and RelS 555 Religion and Politics in America.)

Learning outcomes

General

  • Can examine, articulate and reflect upon ones own ethical views as these relate to the historical development of religion and American society, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.
  • Recognizes the diversity of religious-ethical traditions in American history, e.g. among Americans of different races, regions, national origins and classes, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.
  • Can discuss religiously-based political differences in American society in an historically-informed and civil fashion, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.