IDST 321

Human Rights and the Educated Citizen

4 Undergraduate credits
Effective January 8, 2007 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

This course introduces student to the concepts of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and human rights, Western and non-Western conceptions of human rights, and the complex nature of human rights issues influenced by individual, cultural, and social values. Students will also gain a framework for analytical skills essential to human rights work and the complexity and interdependency of human family which will promote an understanding of the individual, local, and global forces that create abuses and potential solutions at the local, national, and international level. Through community involvement, students will be able to connect human rights theories and cases around the globe to our local community and vice versa and will develop an action plan for a local organization of their choice or in their personal environment. The course will also provide students a great opportunity to take concrete action on human rights issues and get involved in "change" or initiating change in the local community.

Learning outcomes

General

  • Analyze and reflect on the ethical dimensions of legal, social, and scientific issues that pertain to human rights.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with primary human rights documents.
  • Evaluate the role of education in promoting human rights.
  • Examine, articulate, and apply their own ethical views to human rights questions.
  • Identify ways to exercise the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.
  • Know the history and development of human rights, including the contributions of various cultural and philosophical traditions.
  • Recognize the diversity of political motivations and interests of others in the human rights community.
  • Understand and apply core concepts (e.g. politics, rights and obligations, justice, liberty) to specific issues through community based learning.

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Goal 9: Ethical and Civic Responsibility

  • Examine, articulate, and apply their own ethical views.
  • Understand and apply core concepts (e.g. politics, rights and obligations, justice, liberty) to specific issues.
  • Analyze and reflect on the ethical dimensions of legal, social, and scientific issues.
  • Recognize the diversity of political motivations and interests of others.
  • Identify ways to exercise the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.