LING 327

Language and Society

4 Undergraduate credits
Effective August 1, 1998 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

This course focuses on the mutual interactions of languages and human groups which use them. Using local examples, texts and their own experiences, students examine a variety of language attitudes, forms and choices to determine the influence of geography, social class and ethnicity on what people say and how they are perceived; the politics of language policies and standards; the birth and death of speech communities; and the structures of conversations, politeness and stereotypes.

Learning outcomes

General

  • Analyze intersections of language and status, class, gender, network, race and ethnic group affiliation, religion, personality, sexuality, and disability at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of upper-division courses at comprehensive universities.
  • Analyze the methods and findings of sociolinguists at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of upper-division courses at comprehensive universities.
  • Apply methods and findings of sociolinguists to students own communities at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of upper-division courses at comprehensive universities.
  • Apply these methods and concepts to original language data collected within a real, community-based social group at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of upper-division courses at comprehensive universities.
  • Chart the birth and death of speech communities at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of upper-division courses at comprehensive universities.
  • Compare and contrast the structures of conversations, politeness, and stereotypes at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of upper-division courses at comprehensive universities.
  • Critique the politics of language policies and standards at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of upper-division courses at comprehensive universities.
  • Explore language use in real-life contexts at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of upper-division courses at comprehensive universities.
  • Know the methods and concepts underlying the study of language in society at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of upper-division courses at comprehensive universities.
  • Understand the complexity and idiosyncrasies of various language and social structures at a level consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctly characteristic of upper-division courses at comprehensive universities.

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Goal 5: History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.
  • Examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures.
  • Use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories.
  • Develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues.

Goal 7: Human Diversity

  • Understand the development of and the changing meanings of group identities in the United States' history and culture.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the individual and institutional dynamics of unequal power relations between groups in contemporary society.
  • Analyze their own attitudes, behaviors, concepts and beliefs regarding diversity, racism, and bigotry.
  • Describe and discuss the experience and contributions (political, social, economic, etc.) of the many groups that shape American society and culture, in particular those groups that have suffered discrimination and exclusion.
  • Demonstrate communication skills necessary for living and working effectively in a society with great population diversity.