IDST 370

Cinema, Self and Other

4 Undergraduate credits
Effective December 14, 2010 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to analyzing how identities (cultural, sexual, ethnic, etc.) are constructed in and through film. It provides students with the basic vocabulary and primary theoretical approaches to film analysis and asks them to consider how various points of view and social and political issues are presented and framed, and how our fears and fantasies about others are projected on the screen. Students will help select the films for viewing and discussion, keep a journal of responses to our readings and films, and present a film analysis on one of our themes.

Learning outcomes

General

  • Understand the development of and changing meanings of group identities in the United States' history and culture.
  • Analyze ones own attitudes, behaviors, concepts and beliefs regarding diversity, racism, and bigotry.
  • Appreciate the experience and contributions (political, social, economic, etc.) of the many groups that shape American society and culture, in particular those groups that have suffered discrimination and exclusion.
  • Identify and apply the vocabulary of formal film analysis to illustrate artistic elements of film.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the individual and institutional dynamics of unequal power relations between groups in contemporary society.

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Goal 6: The Humanities and Fine Arts

  • Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
  • Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within a historical and social context.
  • Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
  • Engage in the creative process or interpretive performance.
  • Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.

Goal 7: Human Diversity

  • Understand the development of and the changing meanings of group identities in the United States' history and culture.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the individual and institutional dynamics of unequal power relations between groups in contemporary society.
  • Analyze their own attitudes, behaviors, concepts and beliefs regarding diversity, racism, and bigotry.
  • Describe and discuss the experience and contributions (political, social, economic, etc.) of the many groups that shape American society and culture, in particular those groups that have suffered discrimination and exclusion.
  • Demonstrate communication skills necessary for living and working effectively in a society with great population diversity.