MATH 230

Introduction to Mathematical Modeling

2 Undergraduate credits
Effective December 17, 2018 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

Mathematical modeling is the process of using mathematics and computational tools to gain insights into complex problems arising in the sciences, business, industry, and society. Mathematical modeling is an iterative process which involves a computational approach to the scientific method. Assumptions are established, a mathematical structure consistent with those assumptions is developed, hypotheses are produced and tested against empirical evidence, and then the model is refined accordingly. The quality of these models is examined as part of the verification process, and the entire cycle repeats as improvements and adjustments to the model are made. This course provides an introduction to both the mathematical modeling process as well as deterministic and stochastic methods that are commonly employed to investigate time-dependent phenomena.

Prerequisites

Special information

Note: Students whose prerequisites are not identified by the system would contact the Math and Statistics department for an override at MATH@metrostate.edu. First day attendance required except by instructor permission.

Learning outcomes

General

  • This course will focus on the iterative process of mathematical modeling. The assigned coursework will enable students to further refine competency in creative and critical thinking, mathematical modeling, multi-modal communication, and teamwork.
  • Translate everyday situations into mathematical statements (models) which can be analyzed, validated, and interpreted in context;
  • Identify assumptions which are consistent with the context of the problem and which in turn shape and define the mathematical characterization of the problem;
  • Revise and improve mathematical models so that they will better correspond to empirical information and/or will support more realistic assumptions;
  • Assess the validity and accuracy of their approach relative to what the problem requires;
  • Work as members of a team toward a common goal, and
  • Communicate mathematics in both oral and written form.