PSYC 381

The American Male

4 Undergraduate credits
Effective August 1, 1998 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

This independent study looks at traditional patterns of male socialization in the United States and their effect on men's personal well-being, health, relationships and roles in business, family and society. Topics include the historical genesis of male socialization in American culture, stages of male development, men's reactions to the feminist movement, work as a primary focus of male identity, men and competition, homophobia--(men's fear of men), men and violence, and options for new male roles.

Learning outcomes

General

  • Student will demonstrate the ability to make connections between this knowledge and students experiences with men and relationships with women (family, friends, coworkers, and self, if student is male).
  • Student will develop the ability to utilize skills of critical thinking in a community project and in presenting a particular mens issue in a research paper.
  • Student will learn the genesis of male development and their effect on mens health, and family, social and work relationships.
  • Student will understand men from various backgrounds: cultural, class and sexual orientation.

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Goal 5: History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.
  • Examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures.
  • Use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories.
  • Develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues.