HIST 303

U.S. Economic Life: Business

4 Undergraduate credits
Effective August 1, 1998 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

How did the economic undertakings of the first colonists in Virginia and Massachusetts grow into today's businesses? How did American businessmen and women shape the Industrial Revolution and how, in turn, did that revolution influence American business? What is distinctive about American capitalism, and how did it come to be what it is? These and other subjects make up the story of business in U.S. Economic Life.

Prerequisites

Learning outcomes

General

  • An ability to write interpretative historical essays incorporating historical interpretations from secondary sources and documentary evidence from the assigned readings, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.
  • To read and consider representative historical scholarship on periods and subjects in U.S. business history, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.
  • To understand how race, class, and gender influenced choices in and responses to the changing U.S. business environment, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Goal 5: History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.
  • Examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures.
  • Use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories.
  • Develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues.