HIST 310

American Indian History

4 Undergraduate credits
Effective August 1, 1998 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

History 310 is a general survey of the history Native North American nations from pre-contact through the late 20th century. Partly chronological and partly thematic, the course makes use of readings, lectures, films, group projects, community investigation and class discussion to introduce students to the rich diversity of Native North American societies and cultures. A key focus will be the efforts of Native Americans to revitalize their societies through incorporating change within a culturally persistent world-view despite racism associated with the enormous European and European American pressure to assimilate into the dominant society. Course materials will also focus on how Europeans and European Americans were also confronted with the task of incorporating change introduced by Native Americans into their own world-view. The impact of contact and exchange profoundly affected both Native Americans and Europeans and is still affecting their descendants today. Students will be given the opportunity to explore Twin Cities' resources and take a turn at leading a class discussion. Significant focus is given to issues of race and racism.

Prerequisites

Learning outcomes

General

  • Understand how Native Americans perceived and attached meanings to the natural and human created world around them and how those meanings changed over time, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.
  • Describe how Native Americans and Europeans interacted and influenced each other throughout North American history that emphasizes the role of race and racism in those interactions and influences, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.
  • Effectively and respectfully engage in classroom discussion, particularly with respect to race and racism, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.
  • Analyze history in a way that incorporates an appreciation for how people incorporate change within their various culturally persistent beliefs and practices, particularly with respect to race and racism, consistent with the analytical and expressive complexity and sophistication that are distinctively characteristic of upper-division courses completed at a comprehensive university.

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Goal 5: History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.
  • Examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures.
  • Use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories.
  • Develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues.

Goal 7: Human Diversity

  • Understand the development of and the changing meanings of group identities in the United States' history and culture.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the individual and institutional dynamics of unequal power relations between groups in contemporary society.
  • Analyze their own attitudes, behaviors, concepts and beliefs regarding diversity, racism, and bigotry.
  • Describe and discuss the experience and contributions (political, social, economic, etc.) of the many groups that shape American society and culture, in particular those groups that have suffered discrimination and exclusion.
  • Demonstrate communication skills necessary for living and working effectively in a society with great population diversity.