LIT 364

Literature by Immigrants of Color

4 Undergraduate credits
Effective August 16, 2017 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

Students in this course examine literature, film, and expository articles to investigate ways that people of color represent their experiences as immigrants to the U.S. Throughout the course we analyze how various texts present the main themes, perspectives, and socio-cultural contexts of contemporary immigration, which has historically been shaped by racialized discourses and racist gatekeeping practices. We also interrogate how the concerns articulated by immigrants of color intersect with broader social categories such as race, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and citizenship status. Through lectures, discussions, compositions, and small-group activities, students will critically examine the complexities of acculturation and the creativity it takes to balance one's cultural heritage with life in another country as a racialized ethnic minority.

Learning outcomes

General

  • Students can articulate, both verbally and in writing, the ways that U.S. immigrants of color utilize their writings to represent their experiences as American immigrants and the complexities of acculturation.
  • Students can articulate, both verbally and in writing, the ways that U.S. immigrants of color utilize their writings to represent their experiences as American immigrants.
  • Students develop the ability to analyze a range of texts (autobiographies, fiction, poetry, spoken-word, music/dance, film) for their historical and socio-cultural content.
  • Students can explain how the concerns articulated by immigrants of color intersect with broader social categories including race, gender, sexuality, religion, class and citizenship status.
  • Students can explain how the concerns articulated by immigrants of color intersect with broader social categories such as sexuality, age, religion, race, and class.
  • Students demonstrate, through discussions and small-group activities, how texts by U.S. immigrants of color reflect and respond to racism, sexism, classism, and other forms of bigotry, and how immigrant activism reshapes cultural spaces in the United States.
  • Students demonstrate, through discussions and small-group activities, the complexities of acculturation and how immigrant activism also reshapes cultural spaces in the United States.
  • Students can explain through collaborative projects and peer-led activities the significance and implications of immigration as an institution of racialized gatekeeping that has influenced and been shaped by contemporary discourses of race and racism.
  • Students can explain through collaborative projects and peer-led activities the significance and implications of immigration studies on human rights, citizenship, and increasingly globalized communities.

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Goal 6: The Humanities and Fine Arts

  • Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
  • Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within a historical and social context.
  • Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
  • Engage in the creative process or interpretive performance.
  • Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.

Goal 8: Global Perspective

  • Describe and analyze political, economic, and cultural elements which influence relations of states and societies in their historical and contemporary dimensions.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of cultural, social, religious and linguistic differences.
  • Analyze specific international problems, illustrating the cultural, economic, and political differences that affect their solution.
  • Understand the role of a world citizen and the responsibility world citizens share for their common global future.