PSYC 335

Psychology of Women

4 Undergraduate credits
Effective August 1, 1998 – Present

Graduation requirements this course fulfills

This course covers the biological perspectives, cultural variations, psychological sex differences, history of oppression and ethnic diversity explaining the female experience. It is interdisciplinary and includes ideas from biology, sociology, economics, communications and selected traditional psychological theories. The course helps students understand how imposed and real differences between men and women have affected the mental behavioral characteristics of women. It is useful for those who counsel, advise, teach, supervise or work closely with women.

Learning outcomes

General

  • Analyze their own attitudes, behaviors, concepts and beliefs regarding diversity, sexism, racism, and bigotry.
  • Construct logical and coherent arguments when debating hot topics.
  • Demonstrate communication skills necessary for living and working effectively in a diverse society.
  • Develop an increased empathy for women in all their diversity, and develop new understandings of the inequities and challenges faced by women.
  • Develop knowledge of the psychology of women as a discrete field with its own research and theoretical base. From this knowledge students will develop skills to critically evaluate past and current theory and research in the field of psychology and related social sciences.
  • Gain a heightened awareness of the experience of women in society and how this impacts their own and others' personal lives.

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum

Goal 5: History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.
  • Examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures.
  • Use and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories.
  • Develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues.

Goal 7: Human Diversity

  • Understand the development of and the changing meanings of group identities in the United States' history and culture.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the individual and institutional dynamics of unequal power relations between groups in contemporary society.
  • Analyze their own attitudes, behaviors, concepts and beliefs regarding diversity, racism, and bigotry.
  • Describe and discuss the experience and contributions (political, social, economic, etc.) of the many groups that shape American society and culture, in particular those groups that have suffered discrimination and exclusion.
  • Demonstrate communication skills necessary for living and working effectively in a society with great population diversity.