Master of Management Information Systems MMIS

College of Management
Graduate degree

About this program

The Master of Management Information Systems (MMIS) represents an important state-of-the-art concept in graduate education in the field of management information systems (MIS). Merging management and technology education, it is designed to help both technically-oriented information technology (IT) professionals and those from other fields gain expertise in the management of information systems in modern organizations.

The MMIS program goal is to prepare you for management, high-level work and potential leadership in management information systems and related fields, and general management in organizations where information technology is important. The program targets working adults who desire high quality applied MIS education along with solid theory.

The MMIS program will help you:

  • prepare for management of IS, IT, and related functions;
  • prepare to be a leader in the integration of IT into the firm to help meet organizational goals;
  • prepare for management of IT planning processes; and
  • broader strategic uses of IT
  • understand the uses and value of newer technologies in the enterprise
  • enhance competencies related to one concentration area of choice: business analytics, database administration, information management, information assurance and security, systems analysis and design, and systems development.

The Masters in MIS promotes Metropolitan State's well-known ability to tie theory to practice, with a cutting-edge MIS education designed to have a "shelf life" that outlasts successive generations of hardware and software. The program core gives a strong background in management and information technology areas. Flexibility in elective courses, plus applications emphasis throughout courses, internships and the final integrative project gives students a strong base for the future.

The program is designed to serve several distinct groups of Information Technology Management professionals who need a strong mix of management theory and practice along with technological competence. This group needs more technical education than an MBA student, but less than a student who will be working in a purely technical capacity. Those students include:

  • General management professionals who need to understand how to manage the technical and IT aspects of their organizations. These students need the mix of management and technical work that leads to stronger technological understanding and analytical skills, resulting in stronger general management in firms where IT is a part of their competitive strategy.
  • Technical professionals who need to upgrade and update their technological skills while also updating their analytical and management abilities.
    • Technical and project managers also need this type of mix, as well as data, systems analysts, solution architects and managers who will be progressing in their careers.

Any managerial or higher level professional in organizations where IT is important will find the MMIS of great value.

    The MMIS prepares you in the areas of: data analytics, strategic IT management, IT strategy and Internet strategy, supply chain management, IT security management, electronic commerce, enterprise resource planning (ERP), globalization, human factors, knowledge management, customer relationship management (CRM), managing the IT function (operationally), project management, systems analysis and design, social networking strategies for organizations, business/information analytics and business intelligence technology management, mobile, network and telecommunications

    Curriculum

    The Prerequisite Phase assesses and ensures your readiness to begin graduate work in the MMIS program. Prerequisite courses include College Algebra, Statistics and a programming language (programming language can be satisfied concurrently with your first year classes). You may not take MMIS Phase I, II or III program classes until these prerequisite courses have been successfully completed and you are fully admitted to the program.

    Phase I focuses on the functional disciplines of business and organizations as they apply to modern information systems. It provides a solid grounding in the core IT competencies, management, and marketing theories, processes and skills needed by managers in today's rapidly changing environment.

    Phase II consists of a choice of six concentration areas with room for free MIS graduate electives which you choose to best meet your own educational and career needs. The choice of concentration areas is important and enables you to apply for and earn one or more graduate certificates. See the course requirements section below for details. Phase III is the synthesis and capstone phase. The work in this phase calls for you to integrate what you have learned in previous courses and professional experiences to form a coherent picture of IT management within organizations.

    Phase III is the synthesis and capstone phase. The work in this phase calls for you to integrate what you have learned in previous courses and professional experiences to form a coherent picture of IT management within organizations.

    The program makes use of an innovative applied project to "bring it all together." Effective communication is fundamental to good management, and so you are expected to demonstrate writing skills by completing a written report about your work on this project, which is performed with a cohort.

    Student outcomes

    A student graduating with a Masters in Management Information Systems will be able to:

    • Evaluate leadership in IT, applying theoretical principles to practical situations
    • Design effective IT management-related problem-solving strategies for organizations.
    • Evaluate a wide range of current technological alternatives to solve problems in an MIS context.
    • Make solid business driven decisions.  
    • Effectively communicate IT strategies and their implementation solutions to a wide range of organizational recipients.

    Using the choice of Phase II concentration areas, students demonstrate advanced competence in their selected concentration:

    • Business analytics: Employ data analytics tools, statistical methods, and visualization approaches to derive patterns, trends, and performance indicators to answer relevant business questions at the operational, management and governance levels.
    • Database administration: Develop organizational strategies based on using data as a competitive tool, to meet tactical and strategic organizational objectives.
    • Information management: Interact with and oversee technical staff in meeting information management needs.
    • Information assurance and security: Develop and deploy policies and other safeguards of information assets to manage and respond to internal and external information assurance threats.
    • Systems analysis and design: Develop and improve system design methodologies to enhance the systems in your organization and to oversee development projects in traditional and emerging IT systems."

    Enrolling in this program

    Program eligibility requirements

    • Familiarity with information systems and technologies demonstrated by at least one of the following:
    • Undergraduate degree in IT/IS/MIS-related major
    • 12 credits of undergraduate IT/IS/MIS-related coursework as part of any major
    • 12 graduate credits in IT/IS/MIS-related degree or certificate program
    • Earned industry certification in IT/IS/MIS-related area
    • Work experience of at least one (1) year in IT/IS-related role, or two (2) years in any functional business role with significant use of management information systems.

    Prerequisites: College Algebra, Statistics, and Visual Programming Language (you can take in the first year)

    Application instructions

    Deadlines

    Application deadlines will not be waived. Applications for admission are not considered until all requirements are met and fees received.

    U.S. citizens:

    Jul 1 - Fall Semester
    Nov 15 - Spring Semester
    Mar 15 - Summer Term

    International students:

    May 1 - Fall Semester
    Sep 1 - Spring Semester
    No Summer Admissions

    Application packet

    Applications are complete once all requirements are met and fee received. Completed application files will be forwarded to the College of Management Graduate Admission Committee for review, please allow 7-10 business days.

    Late applications: applications will continue to be accepted beyond the deadline, however we cannot guarantee admission, though we can defer admission to the next available semester. Incomplete applications will be moved to the next available semester for up to three terms total, giving applicants who need it, up to one year to complete their application file.

    Application file

    A complete application file consists of two parts (three for international applicants.) Begin by completing the online graduate application. All application materials become the property of Metropolitan State University and are not returned.

    Part one

    • Complete the Online Graduate Application  - You will use your Minnesota State StarID  to complete the application. If you don't have a Minnesota State StarID you will create one at the beginning of the application.
      • If you do not have or choose not to provide your Social Security number (SSN) please follow the No SSN instructions to activate your StarID.
      • If you encounter difficulty with the online application please contact admission office.
    • $20 non-refundable application fee; pay online
      • Waived for graduates of Metropolitan State, and for certified veterans & active military.
    • Official transcripts
      • Transcript showing a baccalaureate degree or equivalent earned from a regionally accredited institution with grade-point average or narrative description describing courses completed.
      • Transcripts from any graduate or professional programs are required.
      • All transcripts from non-U.S. schools must be evaluated (course-by-course) by either ECE (preferred) or WES.
      • Electronic transcripts should be sent to admissions@metrostate.edu
      • Paper transcripts should be sent directly from the sending institution (preferred) to:

        Metropolitan State University
        Attn: Graduate Admissions
        700 East Seventh Street
        Saint Paul MN 55106

    Part two

    After you have submitted your online application, log in to the Applicant Portal using your Start ID and password to upload application materials, and check on the status of your application.  The Applicant Portal will indicate missing application items.

    • Current Resume; upload via the Applicant Portal using your StarID.
      • One year of professional work experience is required for the program.
    • Two Professional Reference Letters; upload via the Applicant Portal using your StarID.
      • Two reference letters from employers or others who can attest to the importance of the master's degree in enhancing your professional development and commenting on your ability to pursue and successfully complete a graduate program. Personal reference letters are not accepted.
    • Math Assessment: If you already possess an earned PhD, DDS, MD, or JD degree from an accredited U.S. institution the requirement may be waived. The MMIS program teamed up with ALEKS.com to create an online math assessment specifically designed for our applicants. MMIS College Algebra Component is self-paced math assessment that will teach you the skills you need to succeed.
      • Apply to the program first (see Part One).
      • Please register at www.aleks.com with course code: CHRYG-UWRYJ.
      • Select Purchase an Access Code (cost is $40.00).
      • 70% of topics must be mastered in order to successfully complete the assessment.
      • You have six weeks to complete the assessment, and the assessment must be complete by the application deadline.
    • Admission Essay; upload via the Applicant Portal using your StarID. Your admission essay will serve as both a goals statement and a writing assessment. The admission essay is extremely important to the application review process. Submit your essay in 600-700 words (about three pages) in 12-point font, double-spaced, clearly written, well-organized, with correct grammar, accurate spelling and punctuation, good sentence structure, and clear sub-headings. Make sure that you carefully address each of the following:
      • Pledge of Authorship: Please begin your admissions essay with the following statement: (Your essay will not be accepted if this is not included.) I, (complete name)____________________________________, verify that this admissions essay is my own work, and I am fully aware that discovery otherwise will invalidate my entire application.
      • Describe the kinds of responsibilities and positions you have held in your past work and professional experience (volunteer or employed), both IT-related and others.
      • Explain why you are pursuing a graduate degree at this time in Management Information Systems (MIS).  Please note areas of particular interest in the MMIS program and why you are interested.
      • Describe how a master's degree in MIS will enhance your career and life plans for the future.

    Part three - international students only

    In addition to parts one and two, international applicants in the U.S. or abroad, on any type of visa, are required to provide this information for admission to the university.

    Required by the application deadline:

    • Official scores must be submitted, student copies are not acceptable. Metropolitan State University's school code for TOEFL is 6445.
      • Proof of English proficiency (Official TOEFL or IELTS score)
      • Minimum scores: TOEFL 80 IBT, 213 CBT, 550 PBT or IELTS 6.5
      • IBT=internet based; CBT=computer based; PBT=paper based

    Required only if admitted to the program:

    • If you are offered and accept admission to the program, you are required to provide this information to the International Student Services Office to complete your admission to the university.
      • Financial statement (F1 visa only)
      • Immunization records
      • Copies of passport, visa, I-94, and international home address and phone numbers

    Questions about applying to the MMIS?

    Please contact Shana Vonruden at shana.vonruden@metrostate.edu (preferred) or call 612-659-7290.

    Office location
    MEC Building
    Office M4006
    1300 Harmon Place
    Minneapolis, MN 55403

    Mailing address
    1501 Hennepin Avenue
    Minneapolis, MN 55403

    Course requirements

    Prerequisites

    Prerequisite courses must be successfully completed with a letter grade of C- or better before you can be fully admitted to the MMIS program and take any graduate-level courses.

    MATH 115 College Algebra

    4 credits

    This course develops the fundamental concepts of algebra with an emphasis on the classification and analysis of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions. Applications to the natural and social sciences are given throughout. It aims to provide insights into the nature and utility of mathematics, and helps students develop mathematical reasoning skills.

    Full course description for College Algebra

    STAT 201 Statistics I

    4 credits

    This course covers the basic principles and methods of statistics. It emphasizes techniques and applications in real-world problem solving and decision making. Topics include frequency distributions, measures of location and variation, probability, sampling, design of experiments, sampling distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression.

    Full course description for Statistics I

    First year requirements

    This prerequisite can be completed in the first year of the program, but completion in the first semester is highly recommended: Four credits of a visual programming language or equivalent. Choose one.

    ICS 141 Programming with Objects

    4 credits

    Structure, design, and implementation of object-oriented computer programs. Topics include objects, classes, GUI, and layout managers. Introduction to containment, inheritance, and polymorphism. Programming projects involving multiple classes. Emphasis on methods, parameter passing, and arrays of objects. Exploration of problem-solving and algorithm-design techniques using pseudocode, Unified Modeling Language (UML) class diagrams, and simple patterns. Design of good test cases and debugging techniques.

    Full course description for Programming with Objects

    MIS 328 Applications Development I

    4 credits

    This course provides an overview of applications development methods for managers of information systems. The course assumes no previous programming experience. The course develops elementary concepts of structured programming in the context of a third generation programming language (typically C# ) and then proceeds towards application design using .NET C#. Students learn to apply analytical concepts to translate common business problems into programs using proper design, structure, methodology, and syntax. Students are also exposed to release management and version control concepts in the Enterprise. The goal is to understand the management issues in programming and application development.

    Full course description for Applications Development I

    Requirements (44 credits)

    Phase one (18 credits)

    MIS 600 Management Information Systems

    4 credits

    Management Information Systems (MIS) evolved from essentially an organization's support operation to a strategic element of an organization's life and survival. This course explores information systems' new and expanding roles in the enterprise. Models examined showing how new technologies are assimilated into the organization, how to plan for systems within the overall strategic management process, assess the risk in system development projects, and become a "sophisticated user" of information systems. Traditional and new technologies are utilized. The course also includes a solid review of the strategic and tactical impact of computers, networks and new technologies. . This course broadens understanding of the design and implementation of various computerized information systems to support management decision making and evaluation, and prepares the student to integrate new technologies and configurations into the management process.

    Full course description for Management Information Systems

    MKTG 600 Marketing Management

    4 credits

    This course examines activities through which organizations provide goods and services to serve the needs of the marketplace. Some of the topics included are analysis of internal and external factors of an organization that contribute to a successful marketing campaign, consumer behavior, positioning, , setting marketing objectives, designing marketing strategies and tactics, integrated marketing communications, pricing, and elasticity of demand.

    Full course description for Marketing Management

    MIS 671 Problem Formulation and Data Presentation

    4 credits

    This course provides students with techniques and strategies to work on complex business problems while exercising strong critical thinking skills. It also helps them develop potential solutions. This course then focuses on how to take the results of students' professional work and present complex material in a manner that helps them clearly explain and market their information.

    Full course description for Problem Formulation and Data Presentation

    DSCI 620 Project Management

    4 credits

    This course provides a systematic and comprehensive overview of project leadership and management. Topics covered include all aspects of project management from project initiation issues, RFP formulation, proposal decisions, preparation, and evaluation, project planning and implementation to organization, risk assessment, negotiation, and conflict resolution. Also included are project planning techniques such as PERT, CPM, Earned Value Analysis, and project monitoring and simulation using Microsoft Project software.

    Full course description for Project Management

    MIS 683 Process Analysis and Design

    2 credits

    This course was created to give students a thorough look at the discipline of process analysis and design, workflow analysis and process reengineering. It uses a highly visual approach to both designing and communicating process analysis. Students will learn to properly analyze, design and build the main visualizations for process analysis including flowcharts, data flow diagrams, entity relationship diagrams and others as tools for communicating management designs.

    Full course description for Process Analysis and Design

    Phase two (22 credits)

    Choose one concentration

    Business Analytics Concentration

    Courses listed and 10 additional MIS graduate electives are required.

    MIS 685 Data Mining Tools

    2 credits

    This course introduces how analytics and Data Mining tools can be used to solve business problems like Best Next Offer, Customer Retention, Customer Potential Life Time Value estimation, Market Basket analysis, etc. This course gives students an opportunity to exercise advanced Data Exploration and Mining software. Introduction to Data Mining tools/solutions evaluation is also part of this course.

    Full course description for Data Mining Tools

    MIS 687 Business Analytics

    4 credits

    The improvement in computing and information management technology created opportunity for organizations to generate, store, and process huge amount of data which is being generated in every seconds. Business Analytics provides organizations a new, efficient way to intelligently use those data by combining it with sophisticated analytics. With Business Analytics, organizations can take advantage of data with leveraging and turning it into actionable intelligence that can be used to support reasoned decisions. This course is designed to provide an introduction to the concepts of Business Analytics and its applicability with real world data in a business environment. Students will gain experience using several cutting-edge software in Business Analytics to support business decision making. Students will also be familiarized with the overall life cycle of Business Analytics project (identify the problem, describe the data, analyze the data, interpret the results, and make recommendations…

    Full course description for Business Analytics

    MIS 688 Predictive Analytics

    4 credits

    Currently, enterprises across almost every industry are seeking talent for predictive analytics. Predictive analytics helps connect data to effective action by drawing reliable conclusions about current conditions and future events. Coupled with other types of analytics available (i.e., Descriptive, Diagnostic, and Prescriptive analytics), enterprises can make predictions and then proactively act upon that insight to drive better business outcomes and achieve measurable competitive advantage. Naturally, such demand is met with creative and critical thinking professionals that have been prepared with theories that can be put into practice. The Predictive Analytics course offering includes modules, activities and projects that are structured for following topic objectives: ¿ Understanding the different purposes of analytics (i.e., Diagnostics analytics for data discovery ¿ Why did it happen?, Predictive analytics for forecasting, and simulation ¿ What will happen?, and Prescriptive…

    Full course description for Predictive Analytics

    Choose one

    MIS 686 Advanced Data Mining Tools

    2 credits

    The course gives students an opportunity to start with several Business Problems which require Data Mining techniques like classification, estimation, clustering. Students are supposed to research on Data Mining vendors/tools to find Strengths & Weaknesses for selected Data Mining tools Students are supposed to use 5 groups of Data Mining tools selection criteria: Hardware/OS/Networking, Data reparation/Manipulation, User Interface/Model Output, Algorithms & Manageability, Support/Documentation/Training. The course gives students an opportunity to exercise advanced Data Exploration and Mining software (developed by Synera Systems, Inc.) to analyze Retail Customer Behavior. Students are supposed to use a macro language to document Data Quality problems. Introduction to E-Customer Behavior is also a part of this course.

    Full course description for Advanced Data Mining Tools

    MIS 693 Advanced Supply Chain Information Systems

    2 credits

    Beginning where MIS653/Mktg 653 Supply Chain Management/ Logistics Management leaves off, this course examines the use of information technology to improve efficiency and effectiveness in the corporate supply chain. Topics covered include the strategic role of key information technologies in business-to-business e-commerce; efficient customer response; enterprise resource planning; the virtual value chain. Prerequisite: MIS 653 Supply Chain Management/Logistics Management.

    Full course description for Advanced Supply Chain Information Systems

    Database Administration Concentration

    Courses listed and 10 additional MIS graduate electives are required.

    MIS 653 Supply Chain Information Systems

    2 credits

    This course examines the use of information technology to improve efficiency and effectiveness in the corporate supply chain. Topics covered include key information technologies in supply chain management: Collaborative Planning Forecasting & Replenishment, Electronic Procurement, Inventory management technology (including auto-identification for inventory such as Bar Codes and RFID tags), Labor Management and Manufacturing Execution systems along with Shipping/Transportation Management & Asset Maintenance technologies. Hands-on exercises with actual ERP software will be used as well. Prerequisite: MIS 600.

    Full course description for Supply Chain Information Systems

    MIS 657 Database and Client/Server Systems

    2 credits

    Databases represent not only data storage, but critical organizational assets. MIS professionals must not only understand the basics of database management and relational design, but must also know how to leverage these assets for competitive advantage. This course covers database design and implementation and creation of information and standards. Client/Server technology represents an important part of modern database applications. It allows the firm to implement database applications as efficiently as possible in networked environments. Competence in the application, development, evaluation, management and use of corporate and external databases, including client/server technologies are skills needed by all business people. More importantly it is critical to MIS professionals given the vast array of options and new tools available. Topics in distributed database management including transaction management, concurrency control, deadlocks, replicated database management, query…

    Full course description for Database and Client/Server Systems

    MIS 658 Advanced Database Administration

    2 credits

    This course aims to take students' knowledge of databases (including their application and strategic management) to an advanced level by providing high level concepts and strategies for database administration in the modern firm. The course provides an in-depth description and analysis of the database administration environment, performance management, data integrity and security, and disaster planning, recovery and management. This course provides a solid managerial context for database administration and helps the students learn strategic roles for databases in the modern firm.

    Full course description for Advanced Database Administration

    MIS 680 Introduction to Information Assurance

    4 credits

    Modern organizations operate in a net-centric world. New information technologies arrive at lightning speed, allowing us to share information across town, across the country, and around the world faster than ever before. Organizations in both the public and private sectors organizations suffer from not realizing the value of the information assets they manage. This class will present and provide an introduction to information assurance (IA) and explore a wide range of business services and how they are impacted by IA issues. Topics covered include: How to assess risks and develop a security policy for operational integrity. Learning outcomes for this course include: Defining the roles and responsibilities of technical and non-technical participants in Enterprise systems development and utilization; The applications of information technology in business organizations and managerial decision making; Knowing associated ethical and societal implications; Understanding how emerging…

    Full course description for Introduction to Information Assurance

    MIS 685 Data Mining Tools

    2 credits

    This course introduces how analytics and Data Mining tools can be used to solve business problems like Best Next Offer, Customer Retention, Customer Potential Life Time Value estimation, Market Basket analysis, etc. This course gives students an opportunity to exercise advanced Data Exploration and Mining software. Introduction to Data Mining tools/solutions evaluation is also part of this course.

    Full course description for Data Mining Tools

    Information Management Concentration

    Courses listed and 12 additional MIS graduate electives are required.

    MGMT 620 Organizational Behavior

    3-4 credits

    This course focuses on behavior in organizations as influenced by individual differences, group processes and interactions, and organizational processes. Skills and abilities essential for effective management in changing organizational contexts are emphasized. Topics examined include motivation, diversity, group development team building, power and politics, leadership, job design and organizational culture.

    Full course description for Organizational Behavior

    MIS 653 Supply Chain Information Systems

    2 credits

    This course examines the use of information technology to improve efficiency and effectiveness in the corporate supply chain. Topics covered include key information technologies in supply chain management: Collaborative Planning Forecasting & Replenishment, Electronic Procurement, Inventory management technology (including auto-identification for inventory such as Bar Codes and RFID tags), Labor Management and Manufacturing Execution systems along with Shipping/Transportation Management & Asset Maintenance technologies. Hands-on exercises with actual ERP software will be used as well. Prerequisite: MIS 600.

    Full course description for Supply Chain Information Systems

    MIS 673 Knowledge Management

    2 credits

    This course is designed to define the role of Knowledge Management (KM) in organizations, various components needed to manage knowledge in an organization, leadership skills required to lead a KM initiative, evaluation of existing KM tools and systems, the difference between KM and data management, content management, and information retrieval. It gives special attention to management information systems theories in the organizational setting including: transaction processing, operational reporting, decision support systems and executive information systems. It emphasizes the human aspects of change management, training and implementation with some attention to the role analytics plays to support decisions. The course includes case analysis from texts and real world examples.

    Full course description for Knowledge Management

    MIS 685 Data Mining Tools

    2 credits

    This course introduces how analytics and Data Mining tools can be used to solve business problems like Best Next Offer, Customer Retention, Customer Potential Life Time Value estimation, Market Basket analysis, etc. This course gives students an opportunity to exercise advanced Data Exploration and Mining software. Introduction to Data Mining tools/solutions evaluation is also part of this course.

    Full course description for Data Mining Tools

    Information Assurance Concentration

    Courses listed and 8 additional MIS graduate electives are required.

    MIS 675 Risk Analysis in Information Technology

    2 credits

    Any IT development project contains significant risks. However, keeping the status quo is also risky in rapidly changing technological and competitive environments. This course is designed to familiarize the student with risk analysis concepts derived from many sources including financial, actuarial and statistical studies, insurance and risk analysis, software quality assurance methodologies, management and audit trails and many others. Student will learn to assess the risk in an information systems portfolio and develop strategies for managing the many risk types discussed: Prerequisites: MIS 600.

    Full course description for Risk Analysis in Information Technology

    MIS 680 Introduction to Information Assurance

    4 credits

    Modern organizations operate in a net-centric world. New information technologies arrive at lightning speed, allowing us to share information across town, across the country, and around the world faster than ever before. Organizations in both the public and private sectors organizations suffer from not realizing the value of the information assets they manage. This class will present and provide an introduction to information assurance (IA) and explore a wide range of business services and how they are impacted by IA issues. Topics covered include: How to assess risks and develop a security policy for operational integrity. Learning outcomes for this course include: Defining the roles and responsibilities of technical and non-technical participants in Enterprise systems development and utilization; The applications of information technology in business organizations and managerial decision making; Knowing associated ethical and societal implications; Understanding how emerging…

    Full course description for Introduction to Information Assurance

    MIS 681 Enterprise Security Management

    4 credits

    Organizations with computer networks, Web sites, and employees carrying laptops and mobile devices face an array of security challenges. Among other things, they need to keep unauthorized people out of the network, thwart Web site hackers, and keep data safe from prying eyes or criminal hands. This course provides a high-level overview of these challenges. This course is not for the hard-core IT security engineer who works full time on networks. Instead, it is aimed at the nontechnical executive with responsibility for ensuring that information and assets stay safe and private. The course presents a guide to Thwarting Data Thieves and Hackers and covers the following technical issues in a nontechnical manner: -The concept of "defense in depth" -Network design -Business-continuity planning -Authentication and authorization -Providing security for your mobile work force -Hackers and the challenges they can present -Viruses, Trojans, and worms But it doesn't stop there. The course goes…

    Full course description for Enterprise Security Management

    MIS 682 Analysis of Strategic and Tactical Security IT Planning

    4 credits

    This course is designed to provide students and practitioners a framework to build and implement an IT security strategy that is aligned with their business needs. A key element of Security is developing and implementing these strategies. In the course, you will learn about: 1. Advanced concepts and principles of strategic planning for IT Security. 2. Applications of risk principles, security policies to improve operational integrity are learning outcomes for this course. 3. Roles and responsibilities of technical and non-technical participants in Enterprise systems development and utilization. 4. Applications of information technology in business organizations and managerial decision making, and associated ethical and societal implications. 5. Emerging technologies and the risks they pose to organizations.

    Full course description for Analysis of Strategic and Tactical Security IT Planning

    Systems Analysis and Design Concentration

    Courses listed and 10 additional MIS graduate electives are required.

    MIS 665 Systems Design and Decision Support

    4 credits

    New systems design approaches and techniques are providing extraordinary strategic opportunities to organizations that recognize and implement them. This course shows students state-of-the-art systems design from a managerial perspective rather than a strictly technical approach. Managers who wish to get the most out of new and existing information systems and technical people who wish to see where systems may be going have the opportunity to do so in this class. Beyond current approaches, students are also presented with basic information on new technologies including artificial intelligence and expert systems, which many believe will play a critical role in future systems.

    Full course description for Systems Design and Decision Support

    MIS 662 Management of Distributed Computing

    4 credits

    Surveys of the skills desired by potential employers of graduate management students indicate that use and understanding of technology and its impact is highly valued. In this course you have the opportunity to examine technical architecture and build your skills while learning how to incorporate technology into your management "portfolio." The course uses case studies to review state-of-the-art equipment in each of the basic software and hardware families, while emphasizing management models and higher-level analysis using the computer. Practical projects are assigned giving students real-world opportunities to use these tools to enhance their work and build productivity. Participants will complete a comprehensive and highly practical class project and final exam.

    Full course description for Management of Distributed Computing

    Systems Analysis and Design Concentration

    Choose either MIS 667 (4 credits) or both MIS 643 (2 credits) and MIS 657 (2 credits)

    MIS 667 Telecommunications and Internet Management

    4 credits

    This course explores the range of available telecommunications technologies and how they can be used to facilitate information-access and dissemination at all levels of an organization. Trends in standardization of telecommunications services are analyzed. In addition, students examine how the management information systems or data processing manager can use these services to generate accurate MIS reports in a cost-effective manner. Telecommunications trends in the United States and Europe are addressed in detail. A range of emerging telecommunications services is explored as well as how such services radically alter the ways that organizations gather information for decision making.

    Full course description for Telecommunications and Internet Management

    MIS 643 Telecommunications and Internet Management - Part One

    2 credits

    This course will cover a range of Internet and telecommunications services, applications and the management of telecommunications operations within a business enterprise. It will address the impact of various telecommunications services on day-to-day business operations and analyze the productivity and revenue-enhancement potential available to business. This course is targeted at students who are working business managers with a need to understand the impact of the new and emerging telecommunications services and how they can be harnessed to add value to business operations.

    Full course description for Telecommunications and Internet Management - Part One

    MIS 657 Database and Client/Server Systems

    2 credits

    Databases represent not only data storage, but critical organizational assets. MIS professionals must not only understand the basics of database management and relational design, but must also know how to leverage these assets for competitive advantage. This course covers database design and implementation and creation of information and standards. Client/Server technology represents an important part of modern database applications. It allows the firm to implement database applications as efficiently as possible in networked environments. Competence in the application, development, evaluation, management and use of corporate and external databases, including client/server technologies are skills needed by all business people. More importantly it is critical to MIS professionals given the vast array of options and new tools available. Topics in distributed database management including transaction management, concurrency control, deadlocks, replicated database management, query…

    Full course description for Database and Client/Server Systems

    System Development Concentration

    Courses listed and 10 additional MIS graduate electives are required.

    MIS 657 Database and Client/Server Systems

    2 credits

    Databases represent not only data storage, but critical organizational assets. MIS professionals must not only understand the basics of database management and relational design, but must also know how to leverage these assets for competitive advantage. This course covers database design and implementation and creation of information and standards. Client/Server technology represents an important part of modern database applications. It allows the firm to implement database applications as efficiently as possible in networked environments. Competence in the application, development, evaluation, management and use of corporate and external databases, including client/server technologies are skills needed by all business people. More importantly it is critical to MIS professionals given the vast array of options and new tools available. Topics in distributed database management including transaction management, concurrency control, deadlocks, replicated database management, query…

    Full course description for Database and Client/Server Systems

    MIS 660 Advanced IT Management, Planning and Systems Delivery

    2 credits

    Time to market, competitive advantage, organizational agility and emerging technologies are some of the dynamics that constantly influence IT functions such as Business/IT alignment, strategic IT planning, IT architecture, portfolio management and systems delivery. Understanding the relationships between these drivers, their impact on IT and the associated trade-offs is critical to managing an effective IT organization.

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    MIS 662 Management of Distributed Computing

    4 credits

    Surveys of the skills desired by potential employers of graduate management students indicate that use and understanding of technology and its impact is highly valued. In this course you have the opportunity to examine technical architecture and build your skills while learning how to incorporate technology into your management "portfolio." The course uses case studies to review state-of-the-art equipment in each of the basic software and hardware families, while emphasizing management models and higher-level analysis using the computer. Practical projects are assigned giving students real-world opportunities to use these tools to enhance their work and build productivity. Participants will complete a comprehensive and highly practical class project and final exam.

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    MIS 665 Systems Design and Decision Support

    4 credits

    New systems design approaches and techniques are providing extraordinary strategic opportunities to organizations that recognize and implement them. This course shows students state-of-the-art systems design from a managerial perspective rather than a strictly technical approach. Managers who wish to get the most out of new and existing information systems and technical people who wish to see where systems may be going have the opportunity to do so in this class. Beyond current approaches, students are also presented with basic information on new technologies including artificial intelligence and expert systems, which many believe will play a critical role in future systems.

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    Phase three (4 credits)

    Cohorts are formed each spring semester to do applied IT projects. Twin Cities' organizations are solicited for IT-management-related, systems development or other related projects. Experienced senior faculty oversee teams which determine clients' perceptions and create both team and individual reports.

    MIS 699 Integrative Capstone Project

    4 credits

    Two cohorts per term will be formed to do systems projects, one of which will be Web-based. Twin Cities organizations will be solicited for systems development or other related projects. Resident faculty will oversee teams. Group project and individual reports will be created. Clients' perceptions will be determined. This experience will give the students many networking opportunities in addition to the critical opportunity to apply what they have learned in a rigorous way. Theory and practice will merge to meet the fast-paced requirements of a real world IS environment. When the cohort successfully completes its project, its members will have valuable experiences to draw on for years to come.

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