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English as a Second Language with K-12 Licensure: Urban Education (MS)

About The Program

Expand your credentials to serve the needs of increasing immigrant and refugee populations to learn English for success in school and life. Gain your initial license or an additional Minnesota teaching license for grades K-12 ESL and your Master’s degree. Our flexible program also allows you to complete only the additional K12 ESL licensure program even if you are not interested in the Master’s, or only the Master’s degree without licensure if you just want more understanding and skill in working with English learners of any age.

Our approach to teacher education focuses on preparing diverse, reflective and resilient teachers who are outstanding in their commitment to teaching urban youth and creating equitable educational opportunities. While this program is primarily designed to meet the needs of urban elementary, middle and high schools for licensed ESL teachers who can improve students' educational achievement, others who work with English learners outside of the K-12 school setting will find this concentration worthwhile in our Urban Education Master’s degree.

Program accreditation

This program is accredited by the Minnesota Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board (PELSB) to meet the requirements for being licensed to teach in this specific subject area.

Student outcomes

Students successfully completing this program will meet the following standards for ESL licensure:

  • Understands a variety of methods, techniques, and program models suitable for second language instruction with diverse learners including adapting existing materials to meet the needs of English learners.
  • Uses various content-based methodologies and integrates language acquisition and use of language functions across learning experiences to facilitate full inclusion of English learners in the school setting.
  • Communicates successfully with students, parents, colleagues, and community members.
  • Understands communication instruction in the second language context and the importance of developing communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing across the curriculum.
  • Understands and uses formal and informal second language assessment techniques with criteria to determine appropriate placement and to evaluate the progress of English learners.
  • Understands the contributions of general and applied linguistics to second language education.
  • Understands the fundamentals of the first and second language acquisition processes and their similarities and differences.
  • Understands how the historical, social, and political aspects of language and cultural patterns in the United States influence second language instruction.
  • Understands the teaching of English as a second language that integrates understanding of English as a second language with the teacher's understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development.

How to enroll

Program eligibility requirements

Earned Bachelor’s degree or higher from an accredited institution with a GPA of 2.75 or higher. Students seeking additional K12 licensure must already possess a current Minnesota teaching license in another field or be pursuing another license and finish before or with the ESL licensure program.

Application instructions

Metro State University is participating in the common application for graduate programs (GradCAS). Applications are only accepted via the CAS website.

CAS steps

  1. Select the term for which you are seeking admission (below), and navigate to the CAS website. Open applications include:
  2. Create or log in to your account and select the English as a Second Language with K-12 Licensure: Urban Education (MS) program.
  3. Carefully review all instructions and complete all four sections of the application.

Specific application requirements for individual programs can be found on each program page in CAS. Carefully read the instructions that appear throughout the application pages. You can only submit your application once. If you need to update information you have submitted, please notify graduate.studies@metrostate.edu

Application fee

A nonrefundable $38 fee is required for each application.
Applications will not be processed until this fee is received.

Active-duty military, veterans, and Metro State alumni can receive an application fee waiver. Contact graduate.studies@metrostate.edu.

Courses and Requirements

SKIP TO COURSE REQUIREMENTS

For Additional K12 ESL Licensure

When possible, practicum experiences may be completed where a student works as a teacher. However, ESL practicum experiences must be completed in an inclusive classroom settings working with students who are multilingual language users at the elementary, middle, and high school level.

In addition to completing required coursework with a cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher and practicums, the following are among the requirements for completing the additional ESL licensure program:

  • Licensure application with fee

For Initial K12 ESL Licensure

Practicum experiences working with students are required at the elementary, middle and high school level (at least 120 hours total). Student Teaching (EDU 650) includes 12 weeks, full-time at one school level (i.e. elementary, middle or high school).

In addition to completing required coursework with a cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher and practicums/student teaching, the following are among the requirements for program completion and K12 ESL licensure:

  • Passing all required performance assessments
  • Licensure application with fee

For the Master's Degree (minimum of 34 credits earned at the graduate level)

In addition to the course requirements and earning at least 34 graduate credits and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher, to earn this master's degree students are required to complete a capstone project demonstrating significant mastery in understanding related to a central question on a particular topic of the student’s choice related to urban education. The capstone project may be a traditional, formal written thesis, or a 30-minute presentation. However, if a student decides to do a presentation option for their capstone project, then an additional 3 credit elective must be completed.

Research options for a traditional, formal written thesis include: An extensive literature review, action research or empirical research (qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods). Non-thesis, presentation options for the capstone include: an extensive literature review, an action research project, or an equity proposal/plan. Questions about these options should be directed to the M.S. Urban Education program director.

COURSES NEEDED FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE AND LICENSURE OPTIONS

See the three options below

+ COURSES NEEDED FOR MASTER'S DEGREE IN ESL (NON - LICENSE OPTION) (minimum 34 graduate credits, 7 undergraduate credits)
URBAN ED CORE COURSE (4 credits)

Students who completed EDU 200 and EDU 203 at Metro State University may choose to substitute them for EDU 600 if they will earn at least 34 graduate credits needed for the Master's degree.

This course is designed for graduate level study and conducted in seminar format. The purpose is to explore the impact of successful teaching of diverse students in urban classrooms. Students in the seminar will examine issues related to urban education mirrored in research, theory, and practice while looking at instructional approaches as reflected in the Standards of Effective Practice. Topics will include but not exclusive to multicultural competencies, curriculum transformation, and teacher dispositions. In addition, students will come to understand the role of the students' family, culture, social class, and ethnicity. The seminar is designed to meet several Standards of Effective Practice for the State of Minnesota Board of Teaching (BOT) (State Statute 8700.2000) for all teacher licensing programs.

Full course description for Principles of Urban Education

LINGUISTICS COURSE (4 credits)

Choose one of the following linguistics courses:

The course introduces students to the study of how language is acquired and learned, concepts and methods of analyzing language, and how the field of linguistics studies regional, racial, and gender differences in language. The course examines how the processes of standardization create approved and dominate versions of languages and non-standard and minoritized varieties and dialects of languages. The course also explores linguistic intolerance and prejudice, raciolinguistics, linguistic hierarchy, implicit bias, and privilege. Significant focus is given to issues of race and racism.

Full course description for The Nature of Language

In this course students undertake language analysis (e.g., phonology, morphology, syntax) in a cultural context, including the relationship between language, culture and thought. It presents an anthropological perspective on various linguistic and cultural systems, with special emphasis on those of Chicano/Latino, African-American, American Indian and Anglo-American peoples. Students are introduced to the implications of linguistic and cultural differences in work and classroom situations. Significant focus is given to issues of race and racism throughout the course.

Full course description for Language and Culture

Professional ESL and Reading Courses (18 graduate credits, 3 undergraduate credits)

Field experience (5-15 hours) are required for most professional methods courses.

This course explores the fundamentals of reading instruction. The course provides Early Childhood and pre service k-6 teachers with knowledge of the foundations of the reading and writing process, strategies and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction, assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction, and create a literate environment that fosters reading and writing.

Full course description for Foundations of Teaching Reading in Urban Grades K-6

This course explores advanced theory and practice to support academic literacy among urban learners in secondary classrooms. First, through readings, discursive presentations, and applied exercises, participants in this course will acquire techniques to assist struggling readers and writers. Alongside these skills, course participants will learn how to engage secondary urban learners in assuming responsibility for literacy self-development. Third, the course will include review and development of a variety of materials to teach diverse middle and high school students whose reading and developmental levels vary widely.

Full course description for Literacy Education in Urban Schools - Advanced Theory and Practice

This course includes an examination of theory, research, and practice regarding the process of second language acquisition and various strategies for teaching English Language Learners (ELL) subject matter content in urban K-12 classrooms. Prospective and current urban teachers will learn how to modify mainstream course materials and instructional strategies so that ELL students can engage in course content while simultaneously developing their English language skills. Course activities and expectations include demonstrating teaching strategies; developing lesson modifications; evaluating textbooks and other materials and resources available in the field; and examining issues in testing students of limited English proficiency for placement, diagnosis, exit, and evaluation. There is a requirement of a 10-hour field experience in urban setting involving classroom participant-observations and working with an ELL student.

Full course description for Teaching Assessing ELL Students in Content-Advanced Theory and Practice

This course examines the experience of students in grades K-12 who are immigrants or refugees (or their relatives) living in urban communities, particularly within the Twin Cities. The historical and contemporary push and/or pull factors that contributed to families from various countries and cultures recently coming to the United States will be examined. Important similarities and differences between the experiences and status of immigrants and refugees will also be studied. Particular challenges encountered within the U.S. will be explored, as well as examples of resiliency, achievement, and community resources. Students will gain the understanding of different cultural practices; benefits of bilingual education; how the larger community and the socio-cultural framework shape communication with parents; and how the urban environment conditions may influence learning. Critical issues in urban multilingual immigrant and refugee communities will be discussed. Graduate-level…

Full course description for Immigrants and Refugees in Urban Schools

This course starts with the fundamentals of the first and second language acquisition, and differences between child, adolescent, and adult language acquisition. Students will learn and demonstrate strategies to develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing across the K-12 curriculum. Other topics are: differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language and implications for teaching English learners; and communication techniques that enhance student learning. Students will become familiar with a variety of methods, approaches, techniques, and programs; and will investigate issues related to the full inclusion of English learners in the school setting; and that both language learning and subject matter learning are essential to student success. The teaching of reading and writing across the curriculum will be emphasized, as well as the use of technology. Urban field experience in grades K-12 is part of the course requirements.

Full course description for Theories and Methods of Language Learning

This course includes formal and informal second language assessment techniques to determine placement and to evaluate the progress of English learners in grades K-12. It also addresses criteria for determining the readiness to enter and exit English proficiency programs. Students will gain an understanding of the characteristics and limitations of second language assessment, including the ones for placement in gifted and special education programs; they will learn item and test construction methods appropriate for students with limited English proficiency; and how to administer, interpret, and explain test results to parents and colleagues; rubrics and standards alignment with district goals. Other topics are: curriculum development related to the English learners; program planning; connecting schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further education; involving the community; purpose of co-curricular and extracurricular activities; and best practices. Urban field…

Full course description for Assessment and Curriculum for English Learners in Urban Schools

This course examines the roles and responsibilities of the urban ESL teacher. Students will develop the ability to communicate successfully with English learners in grades K-12, their parents, colleagues, and urban community members. Other topics include bilingualism, multilingualism, resources for continual professional development, classroom management, and working effectively with colleagues and the community to support student learning.

Full course description for The Urban ESL Professional

MASTER’S DEGREE COMPLETION COURSES (12-15 credits)

The following courses are required for students pursuing the Master's degree. EDU 670 and EDU 688 (co-requisites typically offered in the summer), and EDU 698 (typically offered in fall) are taken at the end of the program. If a student chooses to make a 30-minute capstone research presentation instead of writing a formal thesis, then an additional 3 graduate elective credits must also be completed.

This course examines the important role of critical reflection for the professional development and effectiveness of urban teachers in their efforts to provide equitable educational opportunities and increase achievement of their diverse students. Various types of reflection will be practiced in critically thinking about the multiple and complex aspects of the teaching and learning process within a racial, socio-economic, cultural, historical, structural and systemic context. The role of urban educators as agents and leaders of change will be examined, in addition to how reflection can be used as a tool to foster change for educational equity. Reflection during the course will lead to identifying a central focus and question for thesis research.

Full course description for Advanced Reflective Practice for Urban Educators

The course engages students in the variety of educational research designs, analyses and conceptual frameworks appropriate for research in diverse and urban educational settings. The course examines approaches to research for improving classroom or school practices and/or connections with diverse urban or cross-cultural communities. Research methods learned include responsible conduct of research and human subjects protections, quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods along with issues of sampling, measurement, and technical adequacy of observed research results in urban educational settings.

Full course description for Research Methods in Urban/Cross-Cultural Education

This course provides both an introduction to modes of research and scholarship useful in urban education or other diverse cross-cultural educational settings and an opportunity for applying principles learned to classrooms, schools, or communities. Students develop and complete a culminating project of research to improve an aspect of teaching, student learning, a school program/initiative or a community service and share their findings with others.

Full course description for Capstone: Conducting Research in Urban Classrooms, Schools and Communities

+ COURSES NEEDED FOR ESL INITIAL LICENSE AND MASTER’S DEGREE
URBAN ED CORE COURSES (4 graduate credits, 3 undergraduate credits)

Students who completed EDU 200 and EDU 203 at Metro State University may choose to substitute them for EDU 600 if they will earn at least 34 graduate credits needed for the Master's degree. In addition to EDU 600, an Ethnic Studies course (ETHS prefix, at least 3 credits) approved by the School of Urban Education is required.

This course is designed for graduate level study and conducted in seminar format. The purpose is to explore the impact of successful teaching of diverse students in urban classrooms. Students in the seminar will examine issues related to urban education mirrored in research, theory, and practice while looking at instructional approaches as reflected in the Standards of Effective Practice. Topics will include but not exclusive to multicultural competencies, curriculum transformation, and teacher dispositions. In addition, students will come to understand the role of the students' family, culture, social class, and ethnicity. The seminar is designed to meet several Standards of Effective Practice for the State of Minnesota Board of Teaching (BOT) (State Statute 8700.2000) for all teacher licensing programs.

Full course description for Principles of Urban Education

WORLD LANGUAGE LEARNING AND LINGUISTICS COURSES (4+ undergraduate credits)

ESL licensure requirements, as outlined by the Minnesota State licensing board, include learning a second language through two years of second language instruction in a high school setting or one year of second language instruction in a postsecondary setting, or the equivalent. Additionally, choose one of the following linguistics courses:

The course introduces students to the study of how language is acquired and learned, concepts and methods of analyzing language, and how the field of linguistics studies regional, racial, and gender differences in language. The course examines how the processes of standardization create approved and dominate versions of languages and non-standard and minoritized varieties and dialects of languages. The course also explores linguistic intolerance and prejudice, raciolinguistics, linguistic hierarchy, implicit bias, and privilege. Significant focus is given to issues of race and racism.

Full course description for The Nature of Language

In this course students undertake language analysis (e.g., phonology, morphology, syntax) in a cultural context, including the relationship between language, culture and thought. It presents an anthropological perspective on various linguistic and cultural systems, with special emphasis on those of Chicano/Latino, African-American, American Indian and Anglo-American peoples. Students are introduced to the implications of linguistic and cultural differences in work and classroom situations. Significant focus is given to issues of race and racism throughout the course.

Full course description for Language and Culture

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION COURSES (13 graduate credits, 9 undergraduate credits )

Field experiences (5-15 hours) are required for most professional education courses, as well as documented ESL practicum experiences working with students who are multilingual language users. Practicums are required at the elementary, middle and high school level (at least 120 hours total). Students may complete the undergraduate version of any of the following courses that are listed as the 600 level to meet licensure requirements.

This course is an introduction to the use of information technology (IT) devices and applications to promote teaching and learning in k-12 educational settings for students with and without disabilities. Teacher candidates will learn primary tools and software applications to promote teacher productivity and integration of IT to promote curriculum, instruction, assessment, and family/educator communication. In addition to instruction and productivity for k-12 general education settings, the course will include introduction to accessibility issues and the "digital divide" that impact urban learners and educators. Students in this course will demonstrate their competence using technology by developing an electronic, standards-based portfolio.

Full course description for Information Technology for K-12 Education

This course will review development of children grades 1-6 and connect development to the practices used to design programs for grade 1-6 children in urban classrooms. Urban teacher candidates will learn appropriate curriculum and instructional strategies for the presentation of a program which integrates development, skills, and content knowledge in individualized, culturally respectful manners for diverse urban learners. Prospective urban teachers will develop learning plans for grades 1-6 language arts, mathematics, social studies and science and have opportunities to assess their plans as part of a holistic, child-centered curriculum. The rationale and strategies for developmentally appropriate guidance will also be learned. Clinical field experience hours are part of the course requirements.

Full course description for Urban Grades 1-6 Curriculum and Practicum

This course explores the fundamentals of reading instruction. The course provides Early Childhood and pre service k-6 teachers with knowledge of the foundations of the reading and writing process, strategies and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction, assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction, and create a literate environment that fosters reading and writing.

Full course description for Foundations of Teaching Reading in Urban Grades K-6

The course shall provide students with an overview of student exceptionality: students with disabilities and students with gifts and talents. Special emphasis will be placed on characteristics of exceptional children; the legal aspects of educating students with disabilities; and assessment, instructional, and collaborative strategies. An important outcome of this course is to foster participant dispositions toward appreciating the diverse talents of all learners with exceptionalities and to value flexibility and collaboration in adapting instruction for urban students with diverse needs. The content and skills learned and practiced in this course are designed to meet Minnesota standards of effective teaching practice in the area of special education. This course contributes to the mission, vision, and guiding principles of the Metropolitan State Urban Teacher Program. In addition the course is designed for students to integrate knowledge through content reflection and discussion and…

Full course description for Foundations of Teaching Urban Learners with Exceptionalities

This course provides advanced theory and practice regarding common methods of differentiating instruction for urban middle school and high school classrooms. Post-baccalaureate urban teacher candidates learn how to create developmentally appropriate and culturally relevant unit and lesson plans that attend to the various abilities, needs, cultures, experiences, and interests of urban 5-12 students while also meeting district and state standards for learning and making interdisciplinary connections. Foundational understanding of the diverse learning styles and developmental characteristics of young adolescent and adolescent learners forms the basis upon which appropriate plans are developed and methods are employed. The inter-relationships between standards, assessment, curriculum and instruction are examined in promoting high achievement for each urban learner. Teacher candidates examine current trends and research in urban middle school and high school education along with the…

Full course description for Urban Middle School and High School Methods -Advanced Theory and Practice

This practicum is designed to give urban teacher candidates the opportunity to document and reflect upon at least 40 hours practical clinical experience working with diverse youth in an urban middle school or high school. Most of the field experience hours will be determined by field-based assignments required in other Education courses. Included with these experiences, urban teacher candidates practice using diagnostic assessment to guide their instructional planning of at least three lessons for a small group of 1-5 students needing help to improve their reading or mathematics literacy. Successful completion of this practicum is a prerequisite for student teaching. Requirements include attendance and participation in periodic seminars to help prospective urban teacher candidates reflect upon their field experiences, and prepare for future clinical field experiences including student teaching. Co-requisites: EDU 306, OR EDU 606, OR EDU 323, OR EDU 481.

Full course description for Urban Teaching Practicum and Seminar

This course examines current theory and research on the relationship between classroom management and academic achievement to prepare prospective urban teachers for facilitating student learning in a positive classroom environment. Participants in this course will examine teacher and student classroom behaviors from a cross-cultural perspective to recognize the effects of cultural/linguistic differences in the assessment, interpretation, and planning of the instructional and social environment in a class. Students will gain understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create learning environments that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self motivation. Students will also gain understanding of how factors in students' environment outside of school may influence the classroom learning environment. A portion of this course will explore the influence of the use and misuse of drugs, and management strategies for atypical behaviors…

Full course description for Managing Learning in Urban 5-12 Classrooms-Advanced Theory and Practice

This course explores historical, cultural, sociological, and philosophical foundations of education in the United States with an express focus on urban education principles and practices. The metropolitan community is used as a resource for learning about the educational strengths and challenges faced by diverse groups. Students will gain understanding of the contributions and lifestyles of various racial, cultural, and economic groups in our society, including an emphasis on Minnesota-based American Indian culture, history, and tribal government. Core concepts include democracy and education, educational equity for all students, and historical as well as contemporary relationships between school and society. Emphasis is on issues of power and the educational segregation and attempted deculteruralization of historically marginalized groups. Resilience and persistent struggles for equal educational opportunity in the face of oppression are also emphasized from diverse cultural…

Full course description for Historical, Cultural, and Philosophical Foundations of Urban Education

PROFESSIONAL ESL COURSES (15 graduate credits, 3 undergraduate credits)

Field experience (5-15 hours) are required for most professional methods courses as well as documented practicum experiences working with students who are multilingual language users, are required at the elementary, middle and high school level (at least 120 hours total)

This course presents an in-depth study of the predominant current philosophies and methodologies of Early Childhood and Elementary reading instruction. Emphasis will be placed on the critical elements in literacy development. These elements are: phonemic awareness, phonic instruction, vocabulary development, fluency, and comprehension. Current organizational procedures and foundations of reading instruction will be presented. Special consideration is given to effective practices and adapting instruction for culturally and linguistically diverse students.

Full course description for Methods of Teaching Reading in Urban Grades K-6

This advanced pre-student teaching practicum is designed to give urban teacher candidates the opportunity to document and reflect upon at least 60 hours practical clinical experience in an urban middle school or high school classroom within their subject area of licensure. Requirements include teaching at least 3 lessons in their licensure area to a whole class of students, but most of the clinical field experience hours and active classroom involvement will be determined by field-based assignments required in other Education courses and the cooperating urban school teacher hosting the practicum. Successful completion of this practicum is a prerequisite for student teaching. Requirements include attendance and participation in periodic seminars to help prospective urban teacher candidates reflect upon their field experiences, and prepare for student teaching.

Full course description for Advanced Urban Teaching Practicum and Seminar

This course includes an examination of theory, research, and practice regarding the process of second language acquisition and various strategies for teaching English Language Learners (ELL) subject matter content in urban K-12 classrooms. Prospective and current urban teachers will learn how to modify mainstream course materials and instructional strategies so that ELL students can engage in course content while simultaneously developing their English language skills. Course activities and expectations include demonstrating teaching strategies; developing lesson modifications; evaluating textbooks and other materials and resources available in the field; and examining issues in testing students of limited English proficiency for placement, diagnosis, exit, and evaluation. There is a requirement of a 10-hour field experience in urban setting involving classroom participant-observations and working with an ELL student.

Full course description for Teaching Assessing ELL Students in Content-Advanced Theory and Practice

This course examines the experience of students in grades K-12 who are immigrants or refugees (or their relatives) living in urban communities, particularly within the Twin Cities. The historical and contemporary push and/or pull factors that contributed to families from various countries and cultures recently coming to the United States will be examined. Important similarities and differences between the experiences and status of immigrants and refugees will also be studied. Particular challenges encountered within the U.S. will be explored, as well as examples of resiliency, achievement, and community resources. Students will gain the understanding of different cultural practices; benefits of bilingual education; how the larger community and the socio-cultural framework shape communication with parents; and how the urban environment conditions may influence learning. Critical issues in urban multilingual immigrant and refugee communities will be discussed. Graduate-level…

Full course description for Immigrants and Refugees in Urban Schools

This course starts with the fundamentals of the first and second language acquisition, and differences between child, adolescent, and adult language acquisition. Students will learn and demonstrate strategies to develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing across the K-12 curriculum. Other topics are: differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language and implications for teaching English learners; and communication techniques that enhance student learning. Students will become familiar with a variety of methods, approaches, techniques, and programs; and will investigate issues related to the full inclusion of English learners in the school setting; and that both language learning and subject matter learning are essential to student success. The teaching of reading and writing across the curriculum will be emphasized, as well as the use of technology. Urban field experience in grades K-12 is part of the course requirements.

Full course description for Theories and Methods of Language Learning

This course includes formal and informal second language assessment techniques to determine placement and to evaluate the progress of English learners in grades K-12. It also addresses criteria for determining the readiness to enter and exit English proficiency programs. Students will gain an understanding of the characteristics and limitations of second language assessment, including the ones for placement in gifted and special education programs; they will learn item and test construction methods appropriate for students with limited English proficiency; and how to administer, interpret, and explain test results to parents and colleagues; rubrics and standards alignment with district goals. Other topics are: curriculum development related to the English learners; program planning; connecting schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further education; involving the community; purpose of co-curricular and extracurricular activities; and best practices. Urban field…

Full course description for Assessment and Curriculum for English Learners in Urban Schools

This course examines the roles and responsibilities of the urban ESL teacher. Students will develop the ability to communicate successfully with English learners in grades K-12, their parents, colleagues, and urban community members. Other topics include bilingualism, multilingualism, resources for continual professional development, classroom management, and working effectively with colleagues and the community to support student learning.

Full course description for The Urban ESL Professional

STUDENT TEACHING ( 6 credits)

Student teaching is a requirement for licensure seekers only. Student teaching will include 12 full-time weeks in an ESL classroom. Teaching Candidates must notify the Field Experience Director two semesters prior to doing their student teaching. They must also submit a draft student teaching application to their advisors by September 1st for spring placements, and February 1st for fall placements. Board-approved assessment portfolio (edTPA) will be completed concurrently with student teaching.

Supervised student teaching with students in an urban school required for the candidate's licensure area. This course for graduate students seeking initial licensure includes 12 full-time weeks or equivalent required for Minnesota teacher licensure, and required periodic seminars with other student teachers. ** Note: this is a variable credit course with credit range of 2 - 8, but all initial licensure candidates register for 8 credits. Individualized student teaching placements for reduced credit are arranged for currently licensed teachers seeking to expand or add licensure through the post-baccalaureate process.

Full course description for Student Teaching in the Urban School

MASTER’S DEGREE COMPLETION COURSES (12-15 credits)

The following courses are required for students pursuing the Master's degree. EDU 670 and EDU 688 (co-requisites typically offered in the summer), and EDU 698 (typically offered in fall) are taken at the end of the program. If a student chooses to make a 30-minute capstone research presentation instead of writing a formal thesis, then an additional 3 graduate elective credits must also be completed.

This course examines the important role of critical reflection for the professional development and effectiveness of urban teachers in their efforts to provide equitable educational opportunities and increase achievement of their diverse students. Various types of reflection will be practiced in critically thinking about the multiple and complex aspects of the teaching and learning process within a racial, socio-economic, cultural, historical, structural and systemic context. The role of urban educators as agents and leaders of change will be examined, in addition to how reflection can be used as a tool to foster change for educational equity. Reflection during the course will lead to identifying a central focus and question for thesis research.

Full course description for Advanced Reflective Practice for Urban Educators

The course engages students in the variety of educational research designs, analyses and conceptual frameworks appropriate for research in diverse and urban educational settings. The course examines approaches to research for improving classroom or school practices and/or connections with diverse urban or cross-cultural communities. Research methods learned include responsible conduct of research and human subjects protections, quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods along with issues of sampling, measurement, and technical adequacy of observed research results in urban educational settings.

Full course description for Research Methods in Urban/Cross-Cultural Education

This course provides both an introduction to modes of research and scholarship useful in urban education or other diverse cross-cultural educational settings and an opportunity for applying principles learned to classrooms, schools, or communities. Students develop and complete a culminating project of research to improve an aspect of teaching, student learning, a school program/initiative or a community service and share their findings with others.

Full course description for Capstone: Conducting Research in Urban Classrooms, Schools and Communities

+ COURSES NEEDED FOR ESL ADDITIONAL LICENSE AND MASTER'S DEGREE (minimum 34 graduate credits, 7 undergraduate credits)
URBAN ED CORE COURSE (4 credits)

Students who completed EDU 200 and EDU 203 at Metro State University may choose to substitute them for EDU 600 if they will earn at least 34 graduate credits needed for the Master's degree.

This course is designed for graduate level study and conducted in seminar format. The purpose is to explore the impact of successful teaching of diverse students in urban classrooms. Students in the seminar will examine issues related to urban education mirrored in research, theory, and practice while looking at instructional approaches as reflected in the Standards of Effective Practice. Topics will include but not exclusive to multicultural competencies, curriculum transformation, and teacher dispositions. In addition, students will come to understand the role of the students' family, culture, social class, and ethnicity. The seminar is designed to meet several Standards of Effective Practice for the State of Minnesota Board of Teaching (BOT) (State Statute 8700.2000) for all teacher licensing programs.

Full course description for Principles of Urban Education

WORLD LANGUAGE LEARNING AND LINGUISTICS COURSES (4+ undergraduate credits)

State ESL licensure requirements include learning a second language through two years of second language instruction in a high school setting or one year of second language instruction in a postsecondary setting, or the equivalent. Additionally, choose one of the following linguistics courses (LING 316 or LING 326)

The course introduces students to the study of how language is acquired and learned, concepts and methods of analyzing language, and how the field of linguistics studies regional, racial, and gender differences in language. The course examines how the processes of standardization create approved and dominate versions of languages and non-standard and minoritized varieties and dialects of languages. The course also explores linguistic intolerance and prejudice, raciolinguistics, linguistic hierarchy, implicit bias, and privilege. Significant focus is given to issues of race and racism.

Full course description for The Nature of Language

In this course students undertake language analysis (e.g., phonology, morphology, syntax) in a cultural context, including the relationship between language, culture and thought. It presents an anthropological perspective on various linguistic and cultural systems, with special emphasis on those of Chicano/Latino, African-American, American Indian and Anglo-American peoples. Students are introduced to the implications of linguistic and cultural differences in work and classroom situations. Significant focus is given to issues of race and racism throughout the course.

Full course description for Language and Culture

PROFESSIONAL ESL COURSES (18 credits)

Field experiences (5-15 hours) are required for most professional methods courses and documented ESL practicum experiences working with students who are multilingual language users are required at the elementary, middle and high school level (at least 120 hours total).

This course explores the fundamentals of reading instruction. The course provides Early Childhood and pre service k-6 teachers with knowledge of the foundations of the reading and writing process, strategies and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction, assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction, and create a literate environment that fosters reading and writing.

Full course description for Foundations of Teaching Reading in Urban Grades K-6

This course includes an examination of theory, research, and practice regarding the process of second language acquisition and various strategies for teaching English Language Learners (ELL) subject matter content in urban K-12 classrooms. Prospective and current urban teachers will learn how to modify mainstream course materials and instructional strategies so that ELL students can engage in course content while simultaneously developing their English language skills. Course activities and expectations include demonstrating teaching strategies; developing lesson modifications; evaluating textbooks and other materials and resources available in the field; and examining issues in testing students of limited English proficiency for placement, diagnosis, exit, and evaluation. There is a requirement of a 10-hour field experience in urban setting involving classroom participant-observations and working with an ELL student.

Full course description for Teaching Assessing ELL Students in Content-Advanced Theory and Practice

This course examines the experience of students in grades K-12 who are immigrants or refugees (or their relatives) living in urban communities, particularly within the Twin Cities. The historical and contemporary push and/or pull factors that contributed to families from various countries and cultures recently coming to the United States will be examined. Important similarities and differences between the experiences and status of immigrants and refugees will also be studied. Particular challenges encountered within the U.S. will be explored, as well as examples of resiliency, achievement, and community resources. Students will gain the understanding of different cultural practices; benefits of bilingual education; how the larger community and the socio-cultural framework shape communication with parents; and how the urban environment conditions may influence learning. Critical issues in urban multilingual immigrant and refugee communities will be discussed. Graduate-level…

Full course description for Immigrants and Refugees in Urban Schools

This course starts with the fundamentals of the first and second language acquisition, and differences between child, adolescent, and adult language acquisition. Students will learn and demonstrate strategies to develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing across the K-12 curriculum. Other topics are: differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language and implications for teaching English learners; and communication techniques that enhance student learning. Students will become familiar with a variety of methods, approaches, techniques, and programs; and will investigate issues related to the full inclusion of English learners in the school setting; and that both language learning and subject matter learning are essential to student success. The teaching of reading and writing across the curriculum will be emphasized, as well as the use of technology. Urban field experience in grades K-12 is part of the course requirements.

Full course description for Theories and Methods of Language Learning

This course includes formal and informal second language assessment techniques to determine placement and to evaluate the progress of English learners in grades K-12. It also addresses criteria for determining the readiness to enter and exit English proficiency programs. Students will gain an understanding of the characteristics and limitations of second language assessment, including the ones for placement in gifted and special education programs; they will learn item and test construction methods appropriate for students with limited English proficiency; and how to administer, interpret, and explain test results to parents and colleagues; rubrics and standards alignment with district goals. Other topics are: curriculum development related to the English learners; program planning; connecting schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further education; involving the community; purpose of co-curricular and extracurricular activities; and best practices. Urban field…

Full course description for Assessment and Curriculum for English Learners in Urban Schools

This course examines the roles and responsibilities of the urban ESL teacher. Students will develop the ability to communicate successfully with English learners in grades K-12, their parents, colleagues, and urban community members. Other topics include bilingualism, multilingualism, resources for continual professional development, classroom management, and working effectively with colleagues and the community to support student learning.

Full course description for The Urban ESL Professional

STUDENT TEACHING PRACTICUMS (2 credits)

Additional licensure seekers are required to complete field experiences at each of the 3 levels (elementary, middle and high school), and are only required to register for either EDU 656, EDU 657, or EDU 658 in which there will be an 80 hour observed student teaching practicum. Students will also complete the other two practicums with documented field experiences for K-12 licensure. Select from below:

This practicum is designed to give urban teacher candidates the opportunity to be observed/assessed and reflect upon at least 80 hours of field experience working with ELL students in an urban elementary school as required for an additional license. Urban ESL teacher candidates will have the opportunity to reflectively apply knowledge, theories and skills in learned in coursework.

Full course description for Elementary ESL Practicum

This practicum is designed to give urban teacher candidates the opportunity to be observed/assessed and reflect upon at least 80 hours of field experience working with ELL students in an urban middle school as required for an additional license. Urban ESL teacher candidates will have the opportunity to reflectively apply knowledge, theories and skills in learned in coursework.

Full course description for Middle School ESL Practicum

This practicum is designed to give urban teacher candidates the opportunity to be observed/assessed and reflect upon at least 80 hours of field experience working with ELL students in an urban high school as required for an additional license. Urban ESL teacher candidates will have the opportunity to reflectively apply knowledge, theories and skills in learned in coursework.

Full course description for High School ESL Practicum

MASTER’S DEGREE COMPLETION COURSES (12-15 CREDITS)

The following courses are required for students pursuing the Master's degree. EDU 670 and EDU 688 (co-requisites are listed to be offered in the summer), and EDU 698 (listed to be offered in fall) are taken at the end of the program. If a student chooses to make a 30-minute capstone research presentation instead of writing a formal thesis, then an additional 3 graduate elective credits must also be completed.

+ For Additional K12 ESL Licensure

This course examines the important role of critical reflection for the professional development and effectiveness of urban teachers in their efforts to provide equitable educational opportunities and increase achievement of their diverse students. Various types of reflection will be practiced in critically thinking about the multiple and complex aspects of the teaching and learning process within a racial, socio-economic, cultural, historical, structural and systemic context. The role of urban educators as agents and leaders of change will be examined, in addition to how reflection can be used as a tool to foster change for educational equity. Reflection during the course will lead to identifying a central focus and question for thesis research.

Full course description for Advanced Reflective Practice for Urban Educators

The course engages students in the variety of educational research designs, analyses and conceptual frameworks appropriate for research in diverse and urban educational settings. The course examines approaches to research for improving classroom or school practices and/or connections with diverse urban or cross-cultural communities. Research methods learned include responsible conduct of research and human subjects protections, quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods along with issues of sampling, measurement, and technical adequacy of observed research results in urban educational settings.

Full course description for Research Methods in Urban/Cross-Cultural Education

This course provides both an introduction to modes of research and scholarship useful in urban education or other diverse cross-cultural educational settings and an opportunity for applying principles learned to classrooms, schools, or communities. Students develop and complete a culminating project of research to improve an aspect of teaching, student learning, a school program/initiative or a community service and share their findings with others.

Full course description for Capstone: Conducting Research in Urban Classrooms, Schools and Communities